STEM

Mercedes Benz Internship Opportunities

WHAT IS THE CO-0P PROGRAM?

MBUSI gives you the opportunity to gain real world working experience in an international environment. As a Co-Op student  you’ll be placed in a variety of departments. Which include:

Engineering: Process Engineering, Maintenance Engineering, Quality Engineering, Computer Engineering, Series Planning
Business: Human Resources, Communications, Finance, Logistics, Global Service and Parts, and IT.

REQUIREMENTS

Minimum GPA 3.0
Must be able to complete three terms.
Must be able to work in Vance, Alabama

PROGRAM DETAILS

  • Program normally consist of 3 alternating semesters. Students must be able to work a spring, summer and fall semester.
  • Students must be at least at a Sophomore level to participate in the program.
  • Semesters: Spring – January to May; Summer – May to August; Fall – August to December
  • Paid bi-weekly.  Starting pay at $16/hour; graduating pay scale each following  semester.
  • Housing Allowance if the school  is greater than 50 miles away from the MBUSI.
  • Team Wear and Safety Gear are provided.

HOW TO APPLY

Apply through the Co-Op office at your university (MBUSI partner schools).
If you do not attend one of the following universities, please APPLY HERE and, on the resulting page, search for the “Co-Op Student” position opening listed for MBUSI.

 

AEOP Research & Engineering Summer Program

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

Research & Engineering Apprenticeship Program (REAP) is a summer STEM program that places talented high school students, from groups historically under-represented and underserved in STEM, in research apprenticeships at area colleges and universities. REAP apprentices work under the direct supervision of a mentor on a hands-on research project. REAP apprentices are exposed to the real world of research, they gain valuable mentorship, and they learn about education and career opportunities in STEM. REAP apprenticeships are 5-8 weeks in length (minimum of 200 hours) and apprentices receive a stipend.

PROGRAM GOALS

  • To provide high-school students from groups historically under-represented and underserved in STEM, including alumni of the AEOP’s UNITE program, with an authentic science and engineering research experience
  • To introduce students to the Army’s interest in science and engineering research and the associated opportunities offered through the AEOP
  • To provide participants with mentorship from a scientist or engineer for professional and academic development purposes
  • To develop participants’ skills to prepare them for competitive entry into science and engineering undergraduate programs

What is the REAP apprenticeship experience?

REAP apprentices are high-school age students selected for their interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Special consideration is given to under-represented groups.

The REAP Experience is designed to:

  • Motivate students toward a career in science, mathematics, or technology.
  • Expand students’ background and understanding of scientific research.
  • Engage students’ active participation into the philosophy and objectives of scientific research.
  • Expose students to science experiences not readily available in high school.
  • Introduce students to the real world of research in these fields.
  • Partner students with faculty mentors to support current and future professional growth and development.

What do participants gain from a REAP apprenticeship?

REAP apprentices typically spend a summer in a university research program under the tutelage of a professional mentor, performing experiments and carrying out research activities that immerse them in the realities and opportunities of careers in the applied sciences, engineering and mathematics, changing attitudes and firing the imagination of student participants—many who have but a general idea of what a career in these areas entails, and little or no contact with adults doing this work. Through the REAP experience, student participants are exposed to the real world of these careers and are able to see themselves as scientists and researchers.

Shoulder-to-Shoulder with Professionals

In a typical setting, students spend time applying their knowledge, performing experiments, participating in field trips or working in groups. REAP provides a much needed dimension to their education by allowing them opportunities to work shoulder to shoulder with researchers in university laboratories participating in original research, exploring interests and making informed educational and career decisions.

Personal Growth

The REAP experience allows students to find the answers to the questions they themselves pose about a topic. They develop their English language and presentation skills as they articulate the problems they have devised and through their efforts to solve them, they learn to learn on their own. Throughout the summer, students mature both intellectually and emotionally, develop friendships and foster a good sense of collegiate life. Self discovery of personal strengths and weaknesses and the setting of educational and professional goals contribute to personal development. Dr. Rolando Quintana, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering at the University of Texas El Paso writes of his apprentices: “The confidence they have gained is immeasurable, knowing that their future is a college education. They also have access to a college professor for mentoring and guidance through their high school years, and perhaps most importantly, college student mentors.”

Real World Contributions

Many students contribute specifically to the ongoing research of the laboratory project. Dr. Robert Thompson’s research (University of Minnesota) was focused on using silicified plant cells to identify the use of corn in prehistoric pottery. He developed a research technique which allowed identification to a sub specific level, in other varieties of corn. In order to publish this research he needed to have someone duplicate his results. His apprentice Alison Boutin did just that and more. He writes: “Alison proved such a talented, driven, and reliable researcher that I was able to entrust that task to her, which allowed me to present this research at the Second International Congress of Phytolith Research in Aix-en-Provence, France. Remarkably, Alison was then able to take my research one step further, and present the results of her own work at the same conference.”

Deadline to apply is February 28. Click here to learn more…

PROGRAM LOCATIONS

STATEUNIVERSITY
ArkansasUniversity of Arkansas Pine Bluff, Pine Bluff – Biomedical/Nanotechnology
AlabamaAlabama State University, Montgomery – Mathematics & Computer Science
Alabama State University, Montgomery -Biology/Cancer Research
University of Alabama, Huntsville – Nanotechnology
University of Alabama .  Huntsville – Chemistry
University of Alabama, Huntsville – Environmental Engineering
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa – Metallurgical Engineering
CaliforniaCalifornia State University, Sacramento – Engineering & Computer Science
University of California, Berkeley – Environmental Science
San Jose State University, – Engineering
ColoradoColorado State University, Fort Collins – Physics
ConnecticutYale University, New Haven – Biological, Physical & Engineering
DelawareDelaware State University, Dover – Forensics
FloridaFlorida A&M University, Tallahassee – Engineering
University of Central Florida, Orlando – Chemistry
GeorgiaSavannah State University, Georgia – Electronics Engineering/Robotics
Georgia State University, Atlanta – Physics & Astronomy
IowaIowa State University, Ames – Earth Science
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls – Biology/Chemistry/Biochemistry
IllinoisLoyola University, Chicago – Environmental Nanotechnology
University of Illinois Urbana, Champaign – Physical Chemistry
IndianaBall State University, Muncie – Physics & Astronomy
Purdue University, Indianapolis – Mechanical Engineering
MassachusettsUniversity of Massachusetts, Lowell – Physics
MarylandJohn Hopkins University, Baltimore – Engineering
Morgan State, Baltimore – Chemistry
Stevenson University, Stevenson – Biochemistry/Cancer Research
University of Maryland, Baltimore – Biology
MichiganOakland University, Rochester – Mechanical & Electrical Engineering
MinnesotaCollege of Saint Benedict & St. Johns University, St. Joseph – Chemistry
MissouriUniversity of Missouri, St.  Louis – Biology
MississippiJackson State University, Jackson – Biology
Jackson State Univeristy, Jackson – Technology
New HampshireUniversity of New Hampshire, Durham – Nanotechnology
University of New Hampshire, Durham – Biology
North CarolinaFayetteville State University, Fayetteville – Biochemistry
University of North Carolina, Charlotte – Physics
New  JerseyNew Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark – Electrical & Computer Engineering
New Jersey Institute of Technology, Chemistry & Environmental Science
Caldwell University, Caldwell – Chemistry & Natural Sciences
Rutgers University, Camden- Chemistry
Stockton University, Galloway – Chemistry
Union County College, Cranford – Engineering
New MexicoNew Mexico State University, Las Cruces – Molecular Biology
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque – Nanotechnology
NevadaUniversity of Nevada, Las Vegas – Data Science & Engineering
New YorkCity University of New York (CUNY), New York – Material Science
PennsylvaniaUniversity of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia – Engineering & Robotics
Puerto RicoUniversity of Puerto Rico, San Juan – Physics
South DakotaSouth Dakota School of Mines & Technology,  Rapid City – Advance Materials & Engineering
TexasTexas Southern University, Houston – Chemistry
Texas Southern University, Houston – Engineering
Texas Tech University, Lubbock – Electrical & Computer Engineering
University of Houston,  Houston – Biology & Biochemistry
University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington – Applied Mathematics
University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso – Environmental Science
University of Houston-Victoria – Computer Engineering
West Texas A&M University, Canyon – Electrical Engineering
West VirginiaMarshall University, Huntington – Chemistry
Marshall University  School of Pharmacy, Dunbar – Medicine

 

 

Institute on Neuroscience (ION) Summer Research Program

Application

ION seeks applications from highly motivated high school students who have taken at least one college-level science course (e.g., AP Biology, Honors Chemistry, etc.). After participating in an introductory neuroscience course, ION Scholars are matched with mentors by interest to conduct a seven-week mentored laboratory research project. Weekly professional development workshops focus on topics such as scientific communication, the ethical conduct of research and special topics in neuroscience. At the conclusion of the program, students present their laboratory research results at the ION Research Symposium to an audience of peers, family, friends, teachers and community members.

Program Benefits

  • The internship program provides comprehensive preparation for the pursuit of undergraduate science majors.
  • Student Scholars usually finish the program excited about neuroscience, with an interest in exploring neuroscience-related academic and professional careers.
  • Student Scholars are hired and paid taxable hourly wages (through their matched institution) for their full-time commitment of 40 hr/wk during the eight-week program.

Eligibility Criteria

  • Preference for high school students currently enrolled in their junior or senior year (must be 16 years old by June 4th).
  • Grade point average of at least a 3.0 or the equivalent (B average).
  • Advanced Placement (or other college level) science courses recommended.
  • Able to commit full-time (40 hr/wk) to the entire 8-week program (cannot hold other employment or attend other camps during ION).
  • Scholars must arrange in advance local Atlanta housing and transportation, and are responsible for their meals throughout the summer program.

Application Process

All application materials must be received no later than midnight, Sunday, February 4, 2018 (including letters of recommendation and transcripts):

  • Online Application Form – 2018 Application
  • Personal Statement to be uploaded in the Online Application Form
  • Current Resume to be uploaded in the Online Application Form
  • Recommendation by a high school science teacher (emailed to ION@gsu.edu by the recommender)
  • Recommendation by an adult not related to applicant (emailed to ION@gsu.edu by the recommender)
  • Official High School Transcripts sent by the High School (emailed to ION@gsu.edu)
  • Application Fee of $25 – Please use Georgia State University’s Marketplace for your secure online payment at GSU Marketplace

Applications will be reviewed, a subset of applicants will be invited to interview at Georgia State University in mid-March, and final decisions regarding acceptance will be made and applicants notified in early April.

Immunization records, current TB test results, drug test results, and tax documents will be required for all ACCEPTED Scholars.

If any application materials need to be mailed, please mail to the following address:
ION Summer Research Program
Georgia State University
PO Box 5090
Atlanta, GA 30302-5090

Downloadable PDF Flyer – 2018 ION Summer Research Program

 

STEP-UP (Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons

Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP)

The STEP-UP Program provides hands-on summer research experience for high school and undergraduate students interested in exploring research careers.

Application Deadline

  • 02/01/2018 Undergraduate
  • 02/15/2018 High School

Notification of Award

Mid-March 2018

Register to Apply

Log in to the Student Portal

Program Highlights

  • 8 to 10 weeks of full-time research experience
  • Students receive a summer research stipend
  • Students are assigned to a STEP-UP Coordinating Center to help coordinate and monitor their summer research experience
  • Students are paired with experienced research mentors at institutions throughout the nation
  • Students are encouraged to choose a research institution and/or mentor near their hometown or within commuting distance of their residence. Students are not required to relocate in order to conduct their summer research.
  • Students receive training in the responsible conduct of research
  • All-paid travel expenses to the Annual STEP-UP Research Symposium held on NIH’s main campus in Bethesda, Maryland. Students are given the opportunity to conduct a formal oral and poster presentation.

The STEP-UP Program is a federally funded program managed and supported by the Office of Minority Health Research Coordination (OMHRC) in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The overall goal of STEP-UP is to build and sustain a biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social science research pipeline focused on NIDDK’s core mission areas of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases and nutrition; kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases.

 

Development Fund for Black Students in Science and Technology Scholarships

SCHOLARSHIPS

The Development Fund for Black Students in Science and Technology (DFBSST) is an endowment fund which provides scholarships to African-American undergraduate students who enroll in scientific or technical fields of study at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

Selection Process ] [ Eligibility Criteria ] [ Evaluation Criteria ]
Award Determination ] [ Obtaining a Scholarship Application ]

Selection Process

DFBSST identifies students through the assistance of Engineering and Science Department deans and professors at pre-selected, predominantly Black colleges and universities.  DFBSST requests the deans and faculty members to identify a specified number of students that they would like to be considered for scholarships, and to pass on DFBSST scholarship application forms to these students.

Eligibility Criteria

To be eligible for scholarships offered by DFBSST, all applicants must meet the following criteria:

  • African-American, undergraduate student majoring (or intending to major) in a technical field of study (i.e., engineering, math, science, etc.),
  • Be enrolled (or identify his or her intention to enroll) at one of the predominantly Black colleges or universities listed below, and
  • Be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

Evaluation Criteria

Applicants are evaluated based on the following criteria:

  1. Academic achievement (grades and SAT scores, especially science/math),
  2. Personal essay describing career goals, current and past relevant extracurricular activities, etc.,
  3. Recommendations (teachers and guidance counselors), and
  4. Financial need.

Applicants are first ranked based on consideration of items 1, 2 and 3 above. If two (2) applicants are considered to be equal, the candidate with the greatest financial need is ranked higher.

Award Determination

The amount of the scholarships awarded each student is determined by the DFBSST Scholarship Committee. Scholarships are based on merit and financial need. Scholarship awards are up to $3,000 per year. Support is renewed annually, for a maximum of four (4) years, as long as the students remains in good academic standing at the same institution, maintains at least a 3.0 in their major, enrolled in a full-time, undergraduate science or engineering curriculum, and submits a renewal application.

Obtaining a Scholarship Application

Applications can be obtained by contacting the science or engineering department at one of the schools listed below. We do not distribute applications directly to students. All applications must be obtained through and pre-screened by the schools.  There can be no exceptions. Scholarship applications are currently available at the following schools:

Bennett CollegeMorehouse College
Clark Atlanta UniversityMorgan State University
Elizabeth City State UnivNorth Carolina A&T State Univ
Fisk UniversityPrairie View A&M University
Florida A&M UniversitySouthern University
Fort Valley State CollegeSpelman College
Hampton UniversityTennessee State University
Howard UniversityTuskegee University
Langston UniversityWilberforce University
Lincoln University (PA)Xavier University of Louisiana

Scholarship applications become available April 15th and must be submitted by June 15th. Scholarship recipients will be notified in early September.

 

Minority Scholarships and Engineering Scholarships for Minorities

NACME STEM Minority Scholarships Overview

NACME is responsible for more than $4 million in scholarships awarded annually to underrepresented minority (URM) students, with more than $1.6 million awarded in NACME’s funded scholarships and $2.4 million more through our partner institutions’ in-kind support. In 2016, NACME expects to support approximately 1,300 underrepresented minority engineering students.

NACME Scholars (Block Grant) Program

Through the NACME Scholars Program, NACME provides block grants to colleges and universities that, in turn, award the money to talented African American, American Indian, and Latino students enrolled in engineering programs as part of their financial aid packages.

The NACME’s Scholars (Block Grant) Program provides minority college scholarship support in the form of a lump sum grant to partner institutions who enroll students from three sources – first year students identified by NACME or the partner universities, transfer students from two-year colleges, and currently enrolled students who have completed at least one year of engineering study.

University Eligibility

Academic institutions that wish to participate in the scholars grant program must demonstrate a commitment to minority student success that is evidenced in their recruitment, admission, retention, education, and graduation (RAREG) of African American, American Indian, and Latino engineering students.

Student Eligibility

To be eligible for the NACME Scholars Program students must enroll in an engineering program at a partner university, be a URM, and maintain a minimum required GPA (from 2.5 – 2.8). For Fellowships, GPA requirements differ according to the fellowship. Click here for more details about underrepresented minority scholarships (African American, American Indian, and Latino) and other special scholarship programs for minorities.

Academic performance criteria for NACME support differs somewhat for each student stream.

  • High school seniors must be accepted by the university’s college of engineering (at the end of the freshman year, NACME assumes a minimum GPA of 2.5 on a scale of 4.0).
  • Currently enrolled students must have completed a calculus, physics, or chemistry course, earning at least a “B,” and be accepted into engineering.
  • Two-year community college transfers, i.e., those accepted for their third year of engineering study, must enter with at least a 2.7 cumulative GPA on a scale of a 4.0 and an Associate Degree in engineering science (or the equivalent program of study).

For more information about the NACME’s Scholars (Block Grant) Program contact Dr. Chris Smith, Director, Scholarships and University Relations, at 914-539-4316, or email at  scholars@nacme.org.

Payment Distribution

NACME distributes grant payments in two installments each academic year. Under the scholars program, each entering freshman scholar is eligible for $12,500 for up to five years. Two-year transfers and currently enrolled sophomores and beyond are eligible for the identical annual support for up to three years. Scholarship amounts may vary based on the scholar’s financial need to cover the cost of education.

Reporting Requirements

The academic institution provides NACME with a report at the end of the grant period that includes graduation and retention rates as well as biographical information, GPA, and dollar amount of support for each NACME Scholar.

Expectations for Continuance

Partnership agreements are reviewed at the end of five years. Grants are renewed annually to compare institutional performance against established enrollment and graduation goals. NACME expects evidence of continuous improvement toward parity. Such indicators of success would include in the aggregate rising GPAs, reduction in retention rate between NACME Scholars and comparison group (e.g., other minority engineering students or non-minority engineering students), and stable or decreasing time to degree.

NACME In-Kind/Associate Programs

We also encourage universities and colleges not already engaged in our NACME Scholarship Programs to provide in-kind scholarship support to underrepresented minority engineering students attending your school.

Fellowships (Special Scholarships)

The NACME Fellows Program was created to provide an opportunity for individuals and companies interested in establishing a named minority scholarship program in support of NACME’s mission to increase the representation of underrepresented minorities in engineering. This will be accomplished by ensuring that more engineering scholarships for minorities are available.

For more information about how to apply for a fellowship, contact Dr. Chris Smith, Director, Scholarships and University Relations, at 914-539-4316, or email at scholars@nacme.org. For specific information on how to establish a fellowship e-mail, scholarships@nacme.org.

Current NACME Fellowships and Endowments

George Campbell, Jr. Fellowship in Engineering
Dr. George Campbell, Jr. served as NACME’s president and CEO for 11 years. This scholarship honors Dr. Campbell’s service to the mission and vision of increasing the representation of underrepresented minority students in engineering. One student is selected in the sophomore year. The recipient is awarded $5,000 for up to three years. The minimum grade point average required is 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

Sidney and Katherine Friend Scholarship
Joint endowment established between NACME and Polytechnic University. One first-year student is selected and supported for a maximum of five years. The recipient is awarded $2,500 each year. The minimum grade point average required is 2.8 on a 4.0 scale.

William Randolph Hearst Endowment Scholarship
The William Randolph Hearst Foundation supported the creation of this endowed scholarship. Two students are selected in either the first or second year. The recipients are awarded $2,500 each for up to four years. The minimum grade point average required is 2.8 on a 4.0 scale.

Phillip D. Reed Undergraduate Endowment Fellowship
Philip D. Reed endowment fellowship is made possible through an endowment from the Philip D. Reed Foundation. One student is selected in the sophomore year. The award provides $5,000 for up to three years.

The Bechtel Undergraduate Fellowship Award
The Bechtel Undergraduate Fellowship Award is financial support program that encourages and recognizes high academic achievement of students interested in pursuing a corporate career in a construction-related engineering discipline. The award is accompanied by internship and mentoring opportunities. Two students are selected in their junior year. The recipients are awarded $2,500 each for up to two years. The minimum grade point average required is 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

NACME Contact

For more information about the NACME’s Scholars (Block Grant) Program or how to apply for a fellowship, contact Dr. Chris Smith, Director, Scholarships and University Relations, at 914-539-4316, or email at scholars@nacme.org.

Additional Minority Scholarship Resources

Scholarships.com – A listing of scholarships for minorities.

Finaid.com – Information about scholarships and fellowships for minority students. Native American students should also visit the Financial Aid for Native American Students page.

U.S. Department of State – Scholarships, financial aid and student internships.

 

NIH Undergraduate Scholarship Program

UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Undergraduate Scholarship Program (UGSP) offers competitive scholarships to students from disadvantaged backgrounds who are committed to careers in biomedical, behavioral, and social science health-related research. The program offers:

  • Scholarship support
  • Paid research training at the NIH during the summer
  • Paid employment and training at the NIH after graduation

In order to determine if you meet the financial need eligibility guidelines, the UGSP encourages all students to complete the Exceptional Financial Need (EFN) form and submit it to your financial aid office. This form can be filed prior to completion of the online application. Since your eligibility will have to be updated with your 2017 financial aid application data, completion and submission of this form is for informational purposes only. If you choose to submit the form prior to application, please notify the UGSP at ugsp@od.nih.gov, and we will contact you after your university has indicated your eligibility. However, if you do not receive notification of eligibility prior to the application opening date, we encourage you to go ahead and begin the application process.

SCHOLARSHIP SUPPORT

The NIH UGSP will pay up to $20,000 per academic year in tuition, educational expenses, and reasonable living expenses to scholarship recipients. Scholarships are awarded for 1 year, and can be renewed up to 4 years.

RESEARCH TRAINING AT THE NIH

For each full or partial scholarship year, you are committed to two NIH service obligations. The obligations are actually benefits of the UGSP, providing you with invaluable research training and experience at the NIH.

  1. 10-week Summer Laboratory Experience. After each year of scholarship support, you will train for 10 weeks as a paid summer research employee in an NIH research laboratory. This employment occurs after the receipt of the scholarship award. Each scholar will work directly with an NIH Principle Investigator or an NIH postdoctoral fellow, who will serve as mentors.
  2. Employment at the NIH after Graduation. After graduation, you will continue your training as a full-time employee in an NIH research laboratory. You must serve 1 year of full-time employment for each year of scholarship.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

You must meet all of these requirements in order to be eligible for admission into the UGSP.  Please take a moment to use our Eligibility Wizard.

  • U.S.A. citizen or U.S.A. permanent resident
  • Enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a full-time student at an accredited 4-year undergraduate institution located in the United States of America
  • Undergraduate University Grade Point Average of 3.3 or higher on a 4.0-point scale or within the top 5 percent of your class
  • Having ‘Exceptional Financial Need’ as certified by your undergraduate institution financial aid office – see table below (updated 8 November 2017).
Persons in Family
(Includes Only Dependents Listed on Federal Income Tax Forms)
Family Income Level
(Adjusted Gross Income for Tax Year 2016)
Federal Register: Volume 81, Number 15, 25 January 2016, Page 4036
Family Income Level
(Adjusted Gross Income for Tax Year 2017)
Federal Register: Volume 82, Number 19, 31 January 2017, Page 8831
1$23,780.00$24,120.00
2$32,040.00$32,480.00
3$40,320.00$40,840.00
4$48,600.00$49,200.00
5$56,880.00$57,560.00
6$65,160.00$65,920.00
7$73,460.00$74,280.00
8$81,780.00$82,640.00
More than 8 Persons$8,320.00 for Each Additional Person$8,360.00 for Each Additional Person

You are not eligible for the UGSP if any one of the following items pertains to you:

  • You are a high school senior
  • You have been awarded an undergraduate degree
  • You are enrolled in an advanced degree program, such as a master’s degree
  • You are unable to fulfill the payback requirements

APPLICATION INFORMATION

The Application for the 2018-2019 academic year is now open.  To learn more about the application process and requirements, review the videos “How to Apply to the NIH Undergraduate Scholarship Program” and “How to Find an NIH Mentor“.  Your university must also determine whether you meet the required exceptional financial need (EFN) criteria.  To do so, download the EFN form, complete the top section and submit it to the financial aid office at the university you will attend during the 2018-2019 academic year.  Your university will determine your eligibility and forward the form to us.  We strongly advise you to complete the application while waiting for your university to determine your eligibility.

KEY DATES FOR ADMISSION CONSIDERATION IN FALL 2017-2018 ACADEMIC YEAR

(Dates updated 1 November 2017)

  • January 2, 2018 – Application Opens
  • March 15, 2018 – Application Deadline
  • March 30, 2018 – Letter of Recommendation Deadline
  • May 11, 2018 – EFN Form with 2016 Tax Year Information Deadline
  • Mid-June 2018 – Invitations to Phone Interview Distributed
  • Mid-July 2018 – Phone Interviews for Admission
  • Late-July 2018 – Selection of Scholars

This program is administered without discrimination on the basis of age, race, culture, gender, sexual orientation, disability, socioeconomic status, or other nonmerit factors.

NIH is an equal opportunity employer and encourages applications from underrepresented minorities, women, and individuals with disabilities.  NIH is dedicated to building a diverse community in its training and employment programs.

 

TAG-Ed Summer Internship Program

Work on a STEM project at one of over 150 participating Georgia companies! The internships are paid, and the experience is priceless.

The TAG-Ed Summer Internship Program was created to give students like you real world STEM experience at companies around Atlanta and the state of Georgia. For five weeks or more, you will work with a mentor on a specific project, not only honing your technical skills, but also developing the professional skills you will need to excel through high school and beyond.

Applications to become a TAG-Ed Summer Intern are now open! We highly recommend you preview the application before starting by clicking “PREVIEW APP” below. The deadline to apply is June 12. Join more than 800 participants who have grown through their summer experience with TAG-Ed.

“More than anything, this internship was an eye-opening experience for me to see and understand how tech companies work. With this knowledge, I now know what it takes to be a leader in the workplace, and I am more motivated to learn and do well in school.”

KEREN PARK
Intern at The Weather Company

“The internships will surely help open your eyes about the fields you want to pursue. Such an amazing overall experience”

JUSTUS BARNES
Intern at Rural Sourcing, Inc.

“I believe this experience was a great opportunity that would have been hard to obtain through my efforts alone. I sincerely believe the TAG-Ed program is particularly rewarding because of how great and responsive the coordinators are to the students’ needs and expectations!”

AMY LEE
Intern at Delta Data Soft

“TAG-Ed is an excellent program, beginning with the workshops all the way to the placement of your internship. I would recommend this program for anyone because it prepares you for interviews, job opportunities and any type of professional development you would need.”

ERICO CORBETT
Intern at Turner

INTRODUCING: THE STEAMCONCEPT BOOTCAMP

TAG-Ed is partnering with Concept Software, Inc. to bring an alternate opportunity for TAG-Ed intern applicants this summer: STEAM summer bootcamps. These intensive, four-week programs will be made available to top-tier students who are not matched with companies for TAG-Ed summer internships. This presents an excellent opportunity for students to continue building their technology (Course 1: Introduction to Technology) or marketing skills (Course 2: Digital Media Marketing & SEO) to prepare them for future professional experiences – at absolutely no cost!

When applying for your TAG-Ed internship, simply indicate whether you would also like to be considered for the 2017 STEAMConcept Bootcamp. Concept Software will then contact you directly with a secondary application. Note: this will not affect the chances of you receiving a TAG-Ed summer internship. All students will first be considered for a TAG-Ed internship.

 

 

UNCF STEM Scholars Program

UNCF has partnered with The Fund II Foundation to establish a scholarship program to help African American students seeking careers in STEM fields—science, technology, engineering and mathematics. For 2018, The Fund II Foundation UNCF STEM Scholars Program will identify 100 African American high school students who are determined to pursue careers in STEM fields. These students will receive scholarships, internships, mentoring and other tools to help them reach their goals.

Scholars will receive $2,500 per academic year as freshmen and sophomores, $5,000 a year as juniors and seniors, and an additional $5,000 for students whose academic programs require a fifth year.

Are you a STEM student? Apply for the scholarship by January 16, 2018!

With African Americans making up less than five percent of the science and engineering workforce, and less than one percent of all tech startups, this partnership addresses the challenges of more African American students graduating with STEM degrees into the STEM workforce. The Fund II Foundation UNCF STEM Scholars Program will create a robust pipeline of African American students well prepared to have careers in the tech industry and to become the next generation of innovators and entrepreneurs.

 

Science & Human Rights Coalition: 2017 Student Essay Competion

Science & Human Rights Coalition: 2017 Student Essay Competition

30 Apr 2017 -11:59 pm – Submission starts April 1

Undergraduate and graduate students are invited to participate in the AAAS Science and Human Rights Coalition Essay Competition. This essay competition was created to inspire students to explore connections between human rights and science, engineering and the health professions. Students may write on any topic at the intersection of science and/or technology with human rights.

Prizes will be awarded in the following categories: 1) Undergraduate student and 2) Graduate student.

The winning students will be recognized at the July 2017 meeting of the AAAS Science and Human Rights Coalition. Winners of the competition will receive a year of membership in AAAS and a one-year subscription to Science, as well as a travel stipend to attend the Coalition’s meeting, generously provided by the AAAS-Andrew M. Sessler Fund for Science, Education, and Human Rights. Students who receive prizes will be asked to support AAAS stewardship of the Sessler Fund by providing feedback about their experience in the competition. The winning essays will be considered for publication in Professional Ethics Report, a quarterly publication of the AAAS Scientific Responsibility, Human Rights and Law Program.

How to Enter

  1. Submit your essay through the essay competition website which will be open 1 April 2017 through 30 April 2017. Website URL will be available in 2017.
  2. The essay may be submitted in either Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF format.

Eligibility

The competition is open to all undergraduate and graduate students currently enrolled in a degree program.

Students may be enrolled in any discipline. Students enrolled in life science, physical science, social science, health, engineering or mathematics programs are especially encouraged to participate.

Students may be enrolled in any accredited college or university. There is no geographic restriction.

Submissions should be written in the form of an analytic al or critical paper that raises thought-provoking questions. For example, potential essay topics might include: the applications of a scientific approach or a new technology to address specific human rights concerns; an analysis of synergies between human rights obligations and the social responsibilities of scientists, engineers and /or health professionals; or the ways in which full implementation of the right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress may influence realization of other human rights. These examples are only provided to spark ideas: students are encouraged to write essays that reflect their own ideas, interests, and insights.

Papers written for courses are eligible, but all papers must be the original, unpublished work of an individual student.

Each student may submit only one essay.

Entries must be submitted online through the essay competition website, which will be open from 1 April 12:00 am EDT to 30 April 11:59 pm EDT. Late submissions will not be accepted.

Requirements

Essays should be no more than 1,500 words in length.

A complete bibliography should be included, if appropriate. The bibliography and/or footnotes will not count towards the word limit.

Essays should be typed and double -spaced, in an easily readable font (such as Times New Roman), with 1” margins.

All pages must include the title of the essay and page numbers.

Submissions will be judged anonymously so please do not include any personally identifying information (name, university) in the essay document.

Essays must be submitted in English. Essay Judging

  1. Essays will be evaluated for:
  2. Writing quality and clarity;
  3. Analysis and reasoning;
  4. Originality and creativity;
  5. Depth of knowledge and awareness of important human rights issues and scientific challenges; and
  6. Compliance with the essay competition requirements.
    Judges for the competition will be drawn from among the representatives of AAAS Science and Human Rights Coalition Member Associations, as well as Affiliated Individual members of the Coalition. Prominent scientists and engineers from outside the Coalition membership and experienced human rights advocates will also be invited to serve as judges.

Prizes

  1. Prizes will be awarded in the following categories: 1) Undergraduate student and 2) Graduate student.
  2. The winning students will be recognized at the July 2017 meeting of the AAAS Science and Human Rights Coalition. Winners of the competition will receive a year of membership in AAAS and a one – year subscription to Science, as well as a travel stipend to attend the Coalition’s meeting, generously provided by the AAAS – Andrew M. Sessler Fund for Science, Education, and Human Rights.
  3. Students who receive prizes will be asked to support AAAS stewardship of the Sessler Fund by providing feedback about their experience in the competition.

The winning essays will be considered for publication in Professional Ethics Report, a quarterly publication of the AAAS Scientific Responsibility, Human Rights and Law Program.

How to Enter

  1. Submit your essay through the essay competition website which will be open 1 April 2017 through 30 April 2017. Website URL will be available in 2017.
  2. The essay may be submitted in either Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF format.