In the News…

Newsletter: October 1, 2019

October 1, 2019
Mychal Wynn (Northeastern ’79)

Welcome to Our College Planning Cohort Program

We are excited to welcome new students and families to our ASA Guide Right, Atlanta-area, Crossroads for Teens, Florence County School District 3, Guilford County Schools, Pinellas County Schools, Turner Chapel AME Church, and United Ghana Christian Church Cohorts. We are equally excited to be working with students in California, Texas, and Indiana through our online program. Our program is a family affair, where we are working together to assist students in expanding their college and scholarship options.

Congratulations to Sydney and Sydney

Sydney S. and Sydney B. from our Guilford County Schools Cohort continue to receive all-expenses paid Fly-in invitations from some of the country’s most selective colleges:

  • Bowdoin
  • University of Richmond
  • Washington & Lee
  • Williams

Fly-in Programs are highly competitive and require high quality applications and well written essays. Students invited to Fly-in Programs, are in essence, recruited students. Paying travel expenses for 200 students to visit a campus, and hosting them for a weekend, is a significant financial investment. Consequently, receiving a Fly-in invitation can increase a student’s chances of being offered admission to a selective college from less than 20% to over 90%! Sydney S., just visited Bowdoin and Williams, and pictured here is Sydney B., who will be on her way to a Fly-in visit to Washington and Lee. The two Sydneys provide an example for current high school juniors of the importance of identifying and matching to the right Fly-in opportunities, with many applications opening during the spring of your junior year of high school.

High School Seniors

We encourage you to step up your game! Despite our constant prodding, many of you are far behind in finalizing your College Application Plans, choosing your essay topic, writing your essays, requesting recommendation letters from the ‘right’ teachers, and identifying the institutional scholarships for which you are the most competitive. Those of you who have not reached the SAT/ACT scores needed to be offered admission to your colleges, must refocus your attention on either Community College or Test Optional Colleges. It is time to finalize your Action Plans.

Today is the opening of the FAFSA filing period. Most colleges and universities will require that students submit a FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) prior to being considered for financial aid, including need-based grants and scholarships. Some schools will begin distributing their FSEOG funding as completed FAFSAs are received, so submit your FAFSA as soon as possible! Mark your calendar for one of our FAFSA sessions in your area. Modules 13 and 14 in the 2019/20 High School Senior Classroom provide complete guidance to completing the FAFSA and CSS/Profile.

Today is the application deadline for the Engineering Fly-in opportunity at the Voices of Tufts Diversity Experience. The Arts and Sciences application deadline is October 8, 2019.

As a Community-based Partner with Smith College, we can provide students interested in applying to Smith College with CSS/Financial Aid Profile fee waivers. The deadlines to apply for financial aid are November 15 for Early Decision I, January 2 for Early Decision II, and January 25 for Regular Decision. If you are planning to apply and would like a CSS/Profile fee waiver, contact us.

To be considered for merit scholarships at Ursinus College, you must apply by their published deadlines.

Join the College Greenlight online Block Party on October 16 and 17, with Stanford, Northwestern, Rice, Tufts, Colgate, and Vanderbilt. Click here to register.

US News profiled 8 students from one of our local high schools (Roswell High School, Roswell, GA) in the article, “How 8 Georgia Students Made Their College Choices.” What most struck me about the article was the college planning components that were not mentioned, i.e., Net Price Calculator, College Match, The Common Data Set, Fly-in Programs, and most importantly, matching to institutional and full scholarship opportunities. However, I was pleased to see that the class valedictorian, Sameer Khan, was offered admission to Amherst College, where our Guilford County Schools Cohort student, Brenna K., is now a 2nd-year, and found his way to Williams College, where our Georgia Cohort students Kimberly H. and Loren T. are now 3rd-year and 2nd-year students respectively. We are going to contact US News and suggest an article, “How 8 College Planning Cohort Students Made Their Way into Full Scholarship Opportunities.” (University of Richmond, Amherst College, Northeastern University, Northwestern University, Claflin Honors College, UMBC, Williams College, and Elon University)

High School Juniors

To better assist you in avoiding the challenges confronting so many of our current high school seniors, who are struggling with finding the time to finalize their College Application Plans, we will be streamlining our modules for high school juniors to provide step-by-step guidance through your college and scholarship research, within the context of the college list and school-year goals that you developed in the October Module, “Setting Goals within a College Context.” The timeline will be focused on finalizing your College Application Plans by June, 2020. If you know any high school juniors who are in need college planning guidance, particularly those who are academically accomplished, encourage them to register as we will no longer be registering high school juniors after November 1. 

FREE College Fair

Plan to attend the 11th Annual Turner Chapel AME Church College Fair on Saturday, October 26, 2019 from Noon – 3:00 pm. I will be kicking off the college fair with a Pre-college Fair Workshop, “Show Me the Money: Scholarships, Financial Aid, and Making the Right College Choice,”from 11:00 am – Noon. Each year, over 2,000 students and parents take advantage of the opportunity to speak with college representatives and college planning advisers. Over 50 colleges will be represented, including Harvard, Duke, MIT, UGA, and many HBCUs. Some schools will offer on-the-spot scholarships so be sure to bring copies of your résumé, transcript, and SAT/ACT Score Reports.

October Discussion Topics

Students in Grades 9 – 11: Please bring copies of your My Narrative Document, Résumé, 4-year High School Schedule, and Common Data Set Table. Be prepared to share your narrative responses to the 4 Guiding Questions for the October Module – Setting Goals Within a College Context:

  1. What type of grades, course taking, and test scores do you believe are expected by the type of colleges to which you would like to apply for admission?
  2. After reviewing the Common Data Set for each of your colleges, how does your planned course schedule compare to the type of classes and level of rigor recommended by each of your colleges?
  3. Are you planning to take the most rigorous classes offered? If yes, why? If no, why not? Are you planning to take electives relating to your gifts and talents, such as music, art, computer programming? If no, why not? What academic honors are you pursuing? 
  4. Which test does your school or school district support?  Will you focus your test taking strategy on the SAT or ACT? What is your test preparation strategy (describe in detail)? 

Thank you to Atlanta-area Cohort Student, Faith K., for her insightful response to the September Guiding Question:

Writing Prompt – Why Am I Here?: Are you intrinsically motivated to be here, or are you here because of a parent, counselor, teacher, coach, or friend? If you have participated in our program previously, why have you returned? What do you want to gain from your involvement in our program, such as expanding your college options; expanding your scholarship options; or taking a more intentional role in guiding your high school journey through activities, leadership, service, or course taking?

“I am intrinsically motivated to be a part of this cohort program because my goal is to go to law school and through this I have to get my undergrad, pass my LSAT, and be offered admission to law school. This may take a total of 7 years and I want to learn the best way to go about this so that I don’t accumulate debt and have to take out a lot of loans. This is my second year participating in the program, and honestly from last year my mom gave me the option to quit and asked if I still wanted to come back this year and I honestly did want to! I am motivated this year to take it seriously and with this program I want to have scholarship options, leadership opportunities, and overall insight for what I can do to make myself a competitive college candidate.” — Faith K., Atlanta-area Cohort

As a high school junior, Faith’s response provides insight into an important consideration that too few students of color are factoring into their college planning—avoiding student loan debt. The Business Insider article, “8 startling facts that show just how hard the student-debt crisis is hurting black Americans,” notes that 86.6% of black students are using student loans to pay for college and that black students attending HBCUs are graduating with 32% more student loan debt than their black peers at PWIs. Perhaps if more school districts adopted Faith’s attitude, “We don’t want our students to accumulate debt and have to take out a lot of loans,” they would be more supportive of our efforts to expose our program to more students.

Get a Jump Start on Preparing for the November Discussion Topics

Grades 9 – 11: Bring copies of your My Narratives and Careers and College Majors documents and be prepared to discuss your narrative responses to the 4 Guiding Questions for the November Module – Careers and College Majors:

  1. What are the scores from your Interest Profile?
  2. What careers are associated with your profile?
  3. What career are you most interested in and what did you learn from researching this career?
  4. What are the best colleges for your career or college major?

Get Your Questions Answered

As our program expands, we rely on cohort facilitators from our partners to respond to student questions during monthly meetings and in their round table discussions. However, questions may be submitted to us under the following guidelines:

  • Questions should be emailed, by registered students, to cpc@collegeplanningcohort.com.
  • The subject line should identify the online class, module, and unit: “Question: 9-10 Grade: Module 1: Unit 2.”
  • The body of the email should contain your question: “I do not fully understand the differences between AP and dual enrollment classes.”
  • The email must contain the student’s email signature.
  • Students in grades 9 – 11: Questions must pertain to currently assigned units.
  • Seniors: Questions may pertain to any module or unit.
  • Questions must be submitted by the 21st of the month.
  • We will respond by the last day of the month to the entire classroom.

For example, if a student in our 9th-10th grade program, raises a question, we will summarize our responses to all questions presented by students in our 9th-10th program during October and send an email to all registered 9th-10th graders by the final day of October.

Important Dates and Deadlines

Mark Your Calendar

Friday, October 4, 2019: Florence County School District 3 Cohort meeting in the Lake City High School College Corner throughout the day (8:30 am – 4:00 pm).

Saturday, October 5, 2019:Florence County School District 3 • FAFSA Completion in the School Board Room at the School District Offices (9:30 am – 4:00 pm). All seniors and parents are invited to attend.

Sunday, October 5, 2019:United Ghana Christian Church Cohort (10:00 am – 12:30 pm).

Saturday, October 12, 2019:Pinellas County Schools FAFSA Completion • Lakewood High School (Media Center) • 1400 54th Ave, S • St. Petersburg, FL (9:00 am – 2:00 pm). All high school students and parents are invited to attend.

Sunday, October 13, 2019:Atlanta-area Cohort grades 9 – 12. Turner Chapel AME Church • 492 N. Marietta Pkwy • Marietta, GA (11:30 am – 12:45 pm). Parents are invited to attend the worship service (9:30 am) and high school juniors and seniors are invited to attend The Next Episode (9:30 am – a Teen Bible Study held in the Boardroom).

Sunday, October 13, 2019:Crossroads for Teens Cohort  grades 9 – 12. Johnson Ferry Baptist Church • Marietta, GA (3:00 pm – 4:30 pm).

Saturday, October 19, 2019:Guilford County Schools Cohort: Seniors (9:00 am – Noon); Juniors (Noon – 3:00 pm). Bring copies of students’ transcripts and SAT/ACT Score Reports. GTCC Greensboro Campus.

Saturday, October 19, 2019:ASA Guide Right Cohort • Fortis College (9:00 am).

Saturday, October 26, 2019: 10th Annual FREE Turner Chapel AME Church College Fair will host over 50 colleges, community organizations, fraternities, sororities, and workshops. (Noon – 3:00 pm). Mychal Wynn will present a Pre-college Fair Workshop from 10:30 am – Noon on issues raised in, “Show Me the Money: Scholarships, Financial Aid, and Making the Right College Choice.”
Join a Cohort: Register Now

Our online registration is only open to students interested in joining our Atlanta-area Cohort or working independently through our online classroom. Students participating in a school district or community partner should register with their program facilitator.

New Students who will be joining our Atlanta-area Cohort or participating in our online program, can register at the following links:

To pay your registration in two installments, contact our office: ph: 678.395.5825 or email: cpc@collegeplanningcohort.com

Click here to register for returning students (who participated in our 2018/19 cohort).

Click here to learn more about our cohorts and other programs…

Newsletter: September 1, 2019

September 1, 2019
Mychal Wynn (Northeastern ’79)

Welcome to our 2019/20 College Planning Cohort Program!

We had a great information session with students and parents from our partnership with the Alpharetta-Smyrna Alumni Chapter of the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., ASA Guide Right Program (pictured below with Doug Lucas, ASA Guide Right Cohort Director). We were excited to introduce the many changes to our program and examples of the great student outcomes we can achieve through a strong collaboration. We are also grateful to Eric Nelums, a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., and Turner Chapel AME Church, who has agreed to photograph and videotape our Atlanta-area Cohort meetings to assist us in developing a Cohort Facilitator Training Curriculum.

High School Seniors

We are excited to extend our support of high school seniors with our 2019/20 High School Senior Online Activities, providing comprehensive guidance through the college admissions, financial aid, and enrollment processes. After each registered senior completes the pre-registration activities on our New Student webpage, we will provide students with a College Planning Assessment and Recommendation Action Plan.

High School Students in Grades 9 – 11

What are your college/career aspirations? What are your family’s financial needs? Answering these questions is at the heart of our 2019/20 College Planning Program for high school students in grades 9 – 11. The activities and monthly round table discussions will be focused on developing the strongest possible, “Body of Work.” Students will be guided in grade level appropriate conversations (9th-10th and 11th Grade) into a deeper understanding of the importance of pursuing, “Exceptionality” in their gifts, talents, and academic focus as they are guided in aligning their classes, grades, test scores, activities, leadership, and service with their college aspirations, and family’s financial needs. High school juniors will receive a College Planning Assessment and Recommendation Action Plan at the end of the first semester.

Guiding Questions

At the core of our 2019/20 College Planning Program are ‘Guiding Questions’—questions which provide a context for round table discussions at our meetings and conversations between students and parents at home. Activities will be introduced 6 weeks in advance to allow students time to prepare for our monthly meetings. Atlanta-area Cohort students who complete all activities, attend all meetings, and submit a year-end action plan will receive a 2020 Cohort Kente Cloth in recognition of their participation in our program.

Materials

Students will be receiving books and materials from their cohort facilitators. Students in our Atlanta-area cohort will receive their books, binders, t-shirts, and backpacks at our September meeting. All students will be working from the text, “A High School Plan for Students with College-Bound Dreams: Third Edition.” High school seniors will also be receiving the text, “Show Me the Money: A Comprehensive Guide to Scholarships, Financial Aid, and Making the Right College Choice” later during the first semester.

New Student Pre-registration Activities

All newly registered and returning students must complete the 3 pre-registration activities on our New Student webpage. Students must submit fully completed profile forms and résumés prior to being issued login credentials.

September Activities for Grades 9 – 11

After receiving your username and password, log in to the 2019/20 9th-11th Grade Classroom and complete all of the units in ‘Module 1: Welcome.’ Be prepared to discuss your response to the question, “Why Am I Here?” at the September meeting.

October Activities for Grades 9 – 11

Complete ‘Module 2: Setting Goals Within a College Context’ and be prepared to discuss your answers to the Guiding Questions at the October meeting.

Get Your Questions Answered

As our program expands, we rely on cohort facilitators from our partners to respond to student questions during monthly meetings and in their round table discussions. However, questions may be submitted to us under the following guidelines:

  • Questions should be emailed, by registered students, to cpc@collegeplanningcohort.com.
  • The subject line should identify the online class, module, and unit: “Question: 9-10 Grade: Module 1: Unit 2.”
  • The body of the email should contain your question: “I do not fully understand the differences between AP and dual enrollment classes.”
  • The email must contain the student’s email signature.
  • Students in grades 9 – 11: Questions must pertain to currently assigned units.
  • Seniors: Questions may pertain to any module or unit.
  • Questions must be submitted by the 21st of the month.
  • We will respond by the last day of the month to the entire classroom.

For example, if a student in our 9th-10th grade program, raises a question, we will summarize our responses to all questions presented by students in our 9th-10th program during September and send an email to all registered 9th-10th graders by the final day of September.

High School Seniors

Complete the the New Student pre-registration activities so that you may receive your login credentials. There is much work to be done!

Important Dates and Deadlines

Fly-in Opportunities

For those seniors who do not know the impact that being invited to a Fly-in/Diversity Weekend can have on their college admission chances, or for those cohort students who forgot what they learned in the ‘Fly-in/Diversity Weekends’ lesson as a junior, the following Fly-in opportunities are still open:

Congratulations to Sydney, a high school senior from our Guilford County Schools Cohort, who has been invited to the Fly-in Programs at Bowdoin at Williams. Sydney has embraced our program since entering high school, been intentional in pursuing her goals, and has developed an extraordinary body of work, including a #1 Class Ranking. We are confident that we will be reporting Sydney’s extraordinary college options in April, 2020.

Congratulations

Last month, we reported that Nina Shack from our 2019 Turner Chapel AME Church Cohort, was a participant in the Tuskegee Next Aviation Program. We are pleased to congratulate Nina on receiving her private pilot’s license and drone certification (pictured in the first roll, 4th from right! See the Good Morning America interview. 

 

Aleah, from our 2018 Guilford County Schools Cohort has checked in, “I am happy to report that I have been admitted to the third cohort of GAP students at Winston-Salem State’s upper division of nursing.”

Darius, from our 2018 Guilford County Schools Cohort has checked in, “Hello Mrs. Wynn, I wanted to share my first East Carolina bulletin of the year as an RA. Remember our conversations about strategies to avoid student loan debt? Well, I have followed your advice and become an RA! In addition to my state scholarship, I now have my meal plan and housing paid for. Now I don’t have to take out loans or pay out of pocket. Thank you so much for the continuous support and I will keep you updated.”

Morgan, from our 2017 Turner Chapel AME Cohort has checked in, “Hello Mrs. Wynn, I’m still loving Pitt and excited to go back! My major is Economics and my minor is Administration of Justice and I plan to attend law school as soon as I graduate. If I don’t attend law school I’m going to get my Master’s in Economics and branch off from there. I’m also thinking about studying abroad this Spring in Madrid, Spain since I am still taking Spanish classes. Last year I joined the Ultimate Frisbee team, so I get to travel to other states and play against other college teams. On top of that I’m in other clubs which allows me to keep up socially!”

Peyton, from our 2018 Turner Chapel AME Cohort has earned her way into a full scholarship! Peyton, a Posse Scholar (full tuition), has been selected as a George Washington University Resident Adviser (room and board). Peyton is actively involved at George Washington and invites you to read her blog, Words by Peyton.

Summer, from our 2018 Turner Chapel AME Cohort has checked in, “I am absolutely in love with UGA…however, I have switched from Genetics Pre-Med to Genetics Pre-Dental…completing a dental internship this summer has really shown me that dentistry is my passion. Freshman year, I involved myself in a variety of orgs including the Black Affairs Council (I was on the freshman advisory board), minority science student association, and girls in healthcare…this upcoming year I am the programming chair of the Black Affairs Council and Co-Secretary of Girls in Healthcare. Freshman year I also had the chance to go on a mission trip and I plan on engaging in this opportunity annually.”

Congratulations to Turner Chapel AME Cohort student, Nalah Tann-Wilson, who received the Les Dames d’Escoffier Scholarship, valued at $31,493. Nalah will be attending Johnson and Wales University where she will be pursuing a degree in Baking and Pastry Arts.

Mark Your Calendar

Sunday, September 1, 2019: Turner Chapel AME Church deadline for submitting report cards. Full year report cards required for consideration for 2019 Marcus Awards.

Sunday, September 1, 2019: Mr. and Mrs. Wynn will speak to students and parents at the United Ghana Christian Church Cohort at 10:30 am. 

Sunday, September 8, 2019: Atlanta-area Cohort kickoff meeting for grades 9 – 11 will provide an overview of changes to our 2019/20 program; round table discussions with high school seniors; and a meet and greet opportunity for students and parents in grades 9 – 11. TCC ‘The Next Episode’ Ministry Leaders, Charles and Lora Williams, will lead our round table discussions for grades 9 – 11. Mr. and Mrs. Wynn will lead the round table discussions with seniors and their parents. All registered students will receive their books, backpacks, binders, and t-shirts. Please bring copies of your high school transcripts and SAT/ACT Score Reports. Turner Chapel AME Church, Room 187 (11:30 am – 12:45 pm). Atlanta-area cohort juniors and seniors are invited to attend The Next Episode, a teen Bible Study and College Planning Session, from 9:30 am – 11:30 am in the Boardroom.

Sunday, September 8, 2019: Crossroads for Teens kickoff meeting. Johnson Ferry Baptist Church (3:00 pm – 4:30 pm).

Saturday, September 14, 2019: ASA Guide Right Cohort will meet at Fortis College (9:00 am).

Friday, September 20, 2019: Florence County School District 3 Cohort meeting in the Lake City High School College Corner throughout the day (8:30 am – 4:00 pm).

Saturday, September 21, 2019: Guilford County School: Seniors (9:00 am – Noon); Juniors (Noon – 3:00 pm). Parents should plan to attend. Bring copies of students’ transcripts and SAT/ACT Score Reports. GTCC Greensboro Campus

Sunday, September 22, 2019: Turner Chapel AME Church Academic Celebration.

Saturday, September 28, 2019: ASA Guide Right Cohort will meet at Fortis College (9:00 am).

Saturday, October 26, 2019: 10th Annual FREE Turner Chapel AME Church College Fair will host over 50 colleges, community organizations, fraternities, sororities, and workshops. (Noon – 3:00 pm). Mychal Wynn will present a Pre-college Fair Workshop from 10:30 am – Noon on issues raised in, “Show Me the Money: Scholarships, Financial Aid, and Making the Right College Choice.”

Join a Cohort: Register Now

Our online registration is only open to students interested in joining our Atlanta-area Cohort or working independently through our online classroom. Students participating in a school district or community partner should register with their program facilitator.

New Students who will be joining our Atlanta-area Cohort or participating in our online program, can register at the following links:

To pay your registration in two installments, contact our office: ph: 678.395.5825 or email: cpc@collegeplanningcohort.com

Click here to register for returning students (who participated in our 2018/19 cohort).

Click here to learn more about our cohorts and other programs…

RaiseMe

I met representatives from RaiseMe at a recent conference for college admissions professionals held in Salt Lake City. The idea of being connected with colleges that recognize and reward your academic performance, leadership, and service is a good thing. However, prior to setting up a RaiseMe account and logging all of your achievements into your profile throughout high school, you may want to consider what has been written about the program and concept.

Raise.me is opaque in ways that invite skepticism. Start with the name — Raise.me. I know of no other domain name ending in “.me.” Is Raise.me profit or not for profit? Did they cleverly avoid .com identification with the .me designation?

The background story suggests someone is in it for the money. According to a Wall Street Journal report, Raise.me is also known as Raise Labs, Inc., a privately held company financed primarily by venture capitalists. Venture capitalism is not inherently evil, but venture capitalism is surely not charitable. Raise.me seems to be a very sophisticated “cause-related” business, seeking to capitalize on student and family anxiety, concerns about higher education costs, and colleges’ hopes to capture more student interest at an earlier point in their academic lives. (Nelson 2/23/16)

In the almost three years since the service launched, 700,000 high schoolers have signed up. The company says 45% of its users are the first in their family to go to college, and 40% come from a low-income background. These students often don’t have the same access as their wealthier peers to guidance about the variety of colleges and financial aid opportunities— but both Raise.me and its college partners say the service is trying to close that gap. (Mulhere 6/2/17)

Our analysis is that if you are a good student, who is intentional in earning good grades, assuming leadership roles, and performing community service, you will have many need- or merit-based scholarship opportunities at a broad range of colleges. You may identify some of those colleges as RaiseMe partner schools, or you may identify such schools through your own research. 

Need-based Financial Aid

Need-based Financial Aid

Having worked with hundreds of students through our College Planning Cohort Program, and having reviewed hundreds of Financial Aid Award Letters, we have gained first-hand insight into the array of financial aid policies across the college admissions landscape. Students and parents typically believe that the EFC (Expected Family Contribution), as computed by the U.S. Department of Education, after processing a student’s FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid), is the amount that parents (or independent students) are required to pay toward the costs of attending college.

Many institutions will play on the naiveté of students and parents by providing intentionally misleading Financial Aid Award Letters, which suggest that students with ‘0’ or low EFCs will not pay anything toward their college costs. The most common practice involved in this deception is to list Federal Student Loans under the caption, ‘Awards,’ or using such language as, “We are pleased to offer.” while also failing to disclose the estimated Cost of Attendance.

As a result, students and parents assume thousands of dollars in student loan debt as a means of reaching their ‘0’ EFC. Any remaining financial aid gap is oftentimes closed with a combination of small scholarships such as, Achiever’s Scholarship, Trustee Scholarship, Dean’s Scholarship, etc., which are not renewable after the student’s first year. To register for second-year classes, students simply take out more student loan debt and the process continues year after year until students reach their federal student loan maximums, at which time, many students simply stop attending college.

So what does ‘Need-based’ financial aid really mean?

Need-based financial aid simply means that a college will assist in meeting a student’s full financial need, based on either the EFC, as generated by the FAFSA, or the financial need as determined by the CSS/Financial Aid Profile. However, the means through which a student’s financial need is met will vary widely from being met with generous need-based institutional scholarships and grants, to being met with thousands of dollars in student loans. In this regard, there are institutions that have ‘no-loan’ financial aid policies, where student loans are not considered as part of their financial aid formula, and other institutions where student loans represent the most significant part of their financial aid formula.

How do I identify the institutions that offer the most generous institutional scholarships and grants?

Go to the US News and World Reports college rankings and the colleges with the most generous need-based financial aid policies are atop the rankings and among the most selective institutions to which a student can be offered admission. For example, Williams College is the top ranked liberal arts college in the United States and has the most generous financial aid policies that we have experienced through our students. Students with demonstrated financial need receive free books, assistance with their health insurance, transportation, and other unexpected costs associated with attending Williams College. Amherst College, the number two ranked liberal arts college is nearly as generous. Our students with demonstrated financial need have received institutional scholarship offers from Amherst College covering overing 94 percent of the $72,000 per year estimated Cost of Attendance (after application of the US Pell Grant).

Students and parents must carefully research colleges long prior to submitting applications if students are to position themselves for being offered admission to institutions with the most generous need-based financial aid policies. We have listed institutions, of which we are aware, with some of the most generous need-based and institutional scholarship programs:

Top liberal arts colleges: Williams, Amherst, Bowdoin, Swarthmore, Middlebury, Pomona, Carleton, Claremont McKenna, Davidson, Washington & Lee, Colby, Colgate University, Harvey Mudd, Smith, Vassar, Grinnell, Hamilton, Haverford, Wesleyan University, and Bates.

“Williams has one of the most generous financial aid programs in the country, thanks to generations of gifts from alumni, parents, and friends. It allows us to award more than $50 million a year in financial aid to more than half of all Williams students. Our financial aid program is based entirely on need, and we meet 100 percent of every student’s demonstrated need.  We are committed to working with you and your family to make a Williams education affordable.”

We aim to ensure high-achieving students from all backgrounds realize a Colby education is accessible regardless of their families’ means,” said Vice President and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid Matt Proto. “Colby has many ways of expressing this commitment, most notably that we meet the full demonstrated need of admitted students using grants, not loans, in financial aid packages. This cost estimator is another tool for families to see that a Colby education is possible.”

The Ivy League: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, University of Pennsylvania, and Yale.

“Princeton has a long history of admitting students without regard to their financial circumstances and, for more than a decade, has provided student grants and campus jobs — not student loans — to meet the full demonstrated financial need of all students offered admission.”

Top national universities: University of Chicago, MIT, Stanford, Duke, CalTech, Johns Hopkins, Northwestern, Rice, and Vanderbilt.

“Providing for college is one of the largest single investments a family will make, and we strongly believe that a Vanderbilt education is well worth the investment. Opportunity Vanderbiltreflects our belief that a world-renowned education should be accessible to all qualified students regardless of their economic circumstances.”

“We make three important commitments to U.S. Citizens and eligible non-citizens to ensure that students from many different economic circumstances can enroll at Vanderbilt. Vanderbilt will meet 100% of a family’s demonstrated financial need. Instead of offering need-based loans to undergraduate students, Vanderbilt offers additional grant assistance. This does not involve income bands or “cut-offs” that impact or limit eligibility.”

How many colleges should I apply to?

Because financial aid policies so widely vary by institution, the rule of thumb for students who qualify for need-based financial aid, is to apply to as many selective institutions as possible, to which the student is a strong candidate for admission, so that they student and their parents will have many financial aid award letters upon which to base their financial college choice.

The devastating impact of making the wrong college choice

 

University of Virginia Jefferson Scholars

 

The Scholarship

Thomas Jefferson’s University of Virginia is a place where producing leaders for a self-governing people has always been a primary goal. The undergraduate scholarship program has been attracting and cultivating undergraduate leaders since 1980, providing them sufficient financial support so that they are free to develop their talents and to use them for the good of the University community.

Award – ​Intended to cover the entire cost of attendance for four years at the University of Virginia plus coverage of the supplemental enrichment experiences

Total value of the scholarship exceeds:

  • $280,000 for non-Virginian students
  • $150,000 for Virginian students

The Jefferson Scholar Stipend in 2017-2018 will exceed:

  • $62,000 for non-Virginian students
  • $31,500 for Virginian students
  • Jefferson Scholars’ stipend includes tuition, fees, books, supplies, room, board, and personal expenses.

Enrichment – The scholarship also includes an extensive enrichment program which supports and nurtures these students throughout their four years at U.Va.  Opportunities include:

  • Team Challenge Program
  • Institute for Leadership and Citizenship
  • Foreign Travel Studies
  • Alumni Connections Program
  • Career Counseling
  • Public Service Fellows
  • Enrichment Dinners and Receptions

 

LTC Nursing Home Administrator Scholarship

2017 LTC Nursing Home Administrator Scholarship

LTCExam.com, the premier Nursing Home Administrator exam preparation resource nationwide, is proud to announce our first annual scholarship for advancement in higher education. This is a general scholarship which will award the selected applicant with a scholarship award of $2,000. This scholarship will be awarded to students enrolled in an accredited college or university in the United States during the academic year.

Selection and Eligibility Criteria

The annual scholarship award is for one (1) student enrolled in an associate’s degree, bachelor’s degree or graduate level program at an accredited 2-year college or 4-year university during the 2017-2018 academic year.

Applicants must include a 250-word maximum introductory bio with their 500-750 word essay and sign the Scholarship Award Agreement.

$2,000 scholarship will be awarded to one (1) individual students who write the most compelling essay as judged by LTCExam.com staff.

Guidelines for Applicants

Please include the following three items in your submission:

  • 250 word maximum introductory bio about yourself – you may choose to include your work or educational background, why you’re seeking a degree in your field, and why this scholarship interested you.
  • 500-750 word essay response to the question: How can technology improve the lives of retiring seniors?

Other requirements:

  • Applicants must be residents of the United State of America
  • Acceptance into an accredited college or university in the United States of America
  • Signed and dated Scholarship Award Agreement.

Submission Deadline: December 31, 2017

How to Apply

Email scholarship@ltcexam.com to submit your essay, introductory bio, and signed Scholarship Award Agreement. Also provide proof of official transcript & proof of acceptance into an accredited college or university.

Award recipients will be notified individually and announced by January 05, 2018.

Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Scholarships

CBC Spouses Education Scholarship

This scholarship fund was established in response to federal cuts in spending for education programs and scholarships. This is the foundation’s first educational program. The CBC Spouses Education scholarship is a national program that awards scholarships to academically talented and highly motivated students who intend to pursue full-time undergraduate, graduate or doctoral degrees. The Educational Scholarship Fund was established in 1988 and has experienced substantial growth. Recipients for this program are selected through volunteers in the district offices of the members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC). CBC Members work through local scholarship committees to award money to academically talented and highly motivated students.
Deadline: April

CBCF General Mills Health Scholarship

This scholarship program focusing on health was established in 1998 as the CBC partnered with the naming sponsor, General Mills, to increase the number of minority students pursuing degrees in the fields of medicine, engineering, technology, nutrition and other health-related professions. Since the inception of the program, General Mills has invested more than $1,000,000 to underwrite this initiative. The General Mills Health Scholarship has served hundreds of students over the years, and has helped to create leaders in the medical and health related fields.
Deadline: February

CBC Spouses Heineken USA Performing Arts Scholarship

Established in the year 2000, the CBC Spouses Heineken USA Performing Arts scholarship program was developed in honor of the late Curtis Mayfield to ensure that students pursuing a career in the performing arts receive the financial assistance to achieve their goals.
Deadline: May

CBC Spouses Visual Arts Scholarship

The CBC Spouses Visual Arts Scholarship was established in 2006 for students who are pursuing a career in the visual arts.
Deadline: May

CBCF Louis Stokes Health Scholars Program

The Louis Stokes Health Scholars program, sponsored by the United Health Foundation, seeks to increase the number of qualified, yet underrepresented, college students entering the health workforce. Preference will be given to students who demonstrate an interest to work in underserved communities. Students currently attending two-year institutions are strongly encouraged to apply.
Deadline: May

CBCF Environmental Studies Scholarship

The Environmental Studies Scholarship seeks to provide financial awards to minority and women college students pursuing a degree in environmental science or other related fields of study. Applicants should have a junior class standing in college with a declared major in environmental science or a related field, and understanding and acceptance of ServiceMaster’s core values. This scholarship offers $5,000 per semester to two students.
Deadline: July 

Louis Stokes CBCF Scholarship at Case Western University

Every year, Case Western Reserve University awards the Louis Stokes CBCF Scholarship at Case Western Reserve University to two outstanding nominees who are nominated by CBC members. Intended to help economically and educationally disadvantaged students attain an education at Case Western Reserve University, the scholarship offers a full-tuition award, renewable for up to five years; a grant of up to $2,500 to cover the purchase of a computer and books; and assistance securing a paid summer internship. This program is open to all first-year students and transfer students from community colleges. In addition to completing an application for admission into Case Western, applicants must complete an additional 250-500 word essay. For additional information, visit the Case Western Reserve Scholarship page

**Immediate relatives (defined as: one’s parents, step-parents, siblings, spouse, children, step-children, foster children, in-laws, sibling in-laws, grandparents, great grandparents, step-great grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, nieces, and nephews) are not eligible for CBCF scholarship programs**

 

SunTrust Scholarship Sweepstakes

At SunTrust, we’re on a mission to stamp out financial stress. Are you in?

Take the first step and enter the 12th annual SunTrust Off to College Scholarship Sweepstakes, for a chance to win a $500 scholarship to help cover education expenses.*

Who can enter?

High school seniors or college undergraduates (no GPA or financial need requirement)

How often can entrants enter?

Starting September 12, 2016, students can enter online or by mail once during each two week drawing period

Who wins?

Two $500 scholarship winners will be randomly chosen every two weeks beginning October 28, 2016 until May 12, 2017. 30 total winners will be chosen at random during this time period.

Other Sweepstakes Details

 

  • Entries are accepted starting on September 12, 2016; the first drawing is October 28, 2016; subsequent drawings are generally every two weeks thereafter until May 12, 2017
  • Free to enter — eligibility is not based on GPA or financial need
  • Entrants must be a U.S. Citizen or U.S. Permanent Resident, at least 13 years of age and have a permanent residence in one of the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, or the District of Columbia (DC)
  • Eligible colleges: U.S. Department of Education Title IV eligible, 2 and 4 year public and private college and university located in one of the 50 United States or the District of Columbia (DC)
  • Scholarship check will be payable to the winner’s college of attendance
  • Read the Official Rules for the 2016-2017 Off To College Scholarship Sweepstakes.

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