Low Income Students

Need-based Financial Aid

Need-based Financial Aid

Having worked with hundreds of students through our College Planning Cohort Program, and having reviewed hundreds of Financial Aid Award Letters, we have gained first-hand insight into the array of financial aid policies across the college admissions landscape. Students and parents typically believe that the EFC (Expected Family Contribution), as computed by the U.S. Department of Education, after processing a student’s FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid), is the amount that parents (or independent students) are required to pay toward the costs of attending college.

Many institutions will play on the naiveté of students and parents by providing intentionally misleading Financial Aid Award Letters, which suggest that students with ‘0’ or low EFCs will not pay anything toward their college costs. The most common practice involved in this deception is to list Federal Student Loans under the caption, ‘Awards,’ or using such language as, “We are pleased to offer.” while also failing to disclose the estimated Cost of Attendance.

As a result, students and parents assume thousands of dollars in student loan debt as a means of reaching their ‘0’ EFC. Any remaining financial aid gap is oftentimes closed with a combination of small scholarships such as, Achiever’s Scholarship, Trustee Scholarship, Dean’s Scholarship, etc., which are not renewable after the student’s first year. To register for second-year classes, students simply take out more student loan debt and the process continues year after year until students reach their federal student loan maximums, at which time, many students simply stop attending college.

So what does ‘Need-based’ financial aid really mean?

Need-based financial aid simply means that a college will assist in meeting a student’s full financial need, based on either the EFC, as generated by the FAFSA, or the financial need as determined by the CSS/Financial Aid Profile. However, the means through which a student’s financial need is met will vary widely from being met with generous need-based institutional scholarships and grants, to being met with thousands of dollars in student loans. In this regard, there are institutions that have ‘no-loan’ financial aid policies, where student loans are not considered as part of their financial aid formula, and other institutions where student loans represent the most significant part of their financial aid formula.

How do I identify the institutions that offer the most generous institutional scholarships and grants?

Go to the US News and World Reports college rankings and the colleges with the most generous need-based financial aid policies are atop the rankings and among the most selective institutions to which a student can be offered admission. For example, Williams College is the top ranked liberal arts college in the United States and has the most generous financial aid policies that we have experienced through our students. Students with demonstrated financial need receive free books, assistance with their health insurance, transportation, and other unexpected costs associated with attending Williams College. Amherst College, the number two ranked liberal arts college is nearly as generous. Our students with demonstrated financial need have received institutional scholarship offers from Amherst College covering overing 94 percent of the $72,000 per year estimated Cost of Attendance (after application of the US Pell Grant).

Students and parents must carefully research colleges long prior to submitting applications if students are to position themselves for being offered admission to institutions with the most generous need-based financial aid policies. We have listed institutions, of which we are aware, with some of the most generous need-based and institutional scholarship programs:

Top liberal arts colleges: Williams, Amherst, Bowdoin, Swarthmore, Middlebury, Pomona, Carleton, Claremont McKenna, Davidson, Washington & Lee, Colby, Colgate University, Harvey Mudd, Smith, Vassar, Grinnell, Hamilton, Haverford, Wesleyan University, and Bates.

“Williams has one of the most generous financial aid programs in the country, thanks to generations of gifts from alumni, parents, and friends. It allows us to award more than $50 million a year in financial aid to more than half of all Williams students. Our financial aid program is based entirely on need, and we meet 100 percent of every student’s demonstrated need.  We are committed to working with you and your family to make a Williams education affordable.”

We aim to ensure high-achieving students from all backgrounds realize a Colby education is accessible regardless of their families’ means,” said Vice President and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid Matt Proto. “Colby has many ways of expressing this commitment, most notably that we meet the full demonstrated need of admitted students using grants, not loans, in financial aid packages. This cost estimator is another tool for families to see that a Colby education is possible.”

The Ivy League: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, University of Pennsylvania, and Yale.

“Princeton has a long history of admitting students without regard to their financial circumstances and, for more than a decade, has provided student grants and campus jobs — not student loans — to meet the full demonstrated financial need of all students offered admission.”

Top national universities: University of Chicago, MIT, Stanford, Duke, CalTech, Johns Hopkins, Northwestern, Rice, and Vanderbilt.

“Providing for college is one of the largest single investments a family will make, and we strongly believe that a Vanderbilt education is well worth the investment. Opportunity Vanderbiltreflects our belief that a world-renowned education should be accessible to all qualified students regardless of their economic circumstances.”

“We make three important commitments to U.S. Citizens and eligible non-citizens to ensure that students from many different economic circumstances can enroll at Vanderbilt. Vanderbilt will meet 100% of a family’s demonstrated financial need. Instead of offering need-based loans to undergraduate students, Vanderbilt offers additional grant assistance. This does not involve income bands or “cut-offs” that impact or limit eligibility.”

How many colleges should I apply to?

Because financial aid policies so widely vary by institution, the rule of thumb for students who qualify for need-based financial aid, is to apply to as many selective institutions as possible, to which the student is a strong candidate for admission, so that they student and their parents will have many financial aid award letters upon which to base their financial college choice.

The devastating impact of making the wrong college choice

 

Harvard Debate Council Diversity Project

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF HDCDP?

Study at Harvard– Students accepted into this program are simultaneously accepted into Harvard Debate Council’s summer residential program at Harvard College.  This exclusive educational experience provides unmatched future advantages to our students.  The HDCDP board is raising scholarship funds in an effort to cover each student’s tuition, room & board, and travel.

Enhance college application & professional resume – Academic achievement is not enough for top-tiered colleges & universities; they desire students with leadership acumen.  HDCDP students gain exclusive leadership experiences that will enhance their college application and build their professional resume.

Pre-collegiate training – In Atlanta, students will acquire advanced enrichment through a rigorous academic program in which they will explore content higher than what is available in a traditional high school setting.  From January thru June, students will undergo intensive training by Harvard instructors in preparation to study at Harvard College in July.


WHAT DO WE DO?

HDCDP is an Atlanta-based diversity pipeline program designed to raise the young social & political voice in urban Atlanta and matriculate African-American students into the Harvard Debate Council’s summer residential program at Harvard College in Cambridge, MA.  We accomplish this goal through accelerated education and interactive field experience.  HDCDP seeks to develop the young social and political voice through our 3 pillars:

1.) Scholarship: An incubator for academic excellence– Our goal is to train citizens and leaders of the world, which requires global consciousness. Students will explore international issues through a rigorous curriculum centered on critical thinking, research, analysis, and academic debate.  Students are taught by Harvard instructors, during which they identify, cultivate, and use their voice in matters of social and political justice.

2.) Leadership: A launchpad for young leaders – The fact that young people do not have a vote in elections does not mean they shouldn’t have a voice. This program provides exposure to the challenges that confront today’s voting public through unique non-partisan experiences engaging in local politics and community activism in the city of Atlanta.

3.) Culture: A hub for cultural pride – We seek to cultivate cultural ambassadors that reform the meaning of scholarship into one that is appealing and accessible to black youth.  We endeavor to foster a sense of cultural pride through the exploration of African-American history, leadership, and erudition.  Our charge is to develop students that will embody the principle, “Lift as you climb” – ascending the ranks of social status while reaching back to pull others up, too.

Harvard Debate Council

 

Minority Scholarships and Engineering Scholarships for Minorities

NACME STEM Minority Scholarships Overview

NACME is responsible for more than $4 million in scholarships awarded annually to underrepresented minority (URM) students, with more than $1.6 million awarded in NACME’s funded scholarships and $2.4 million more through our partner institutions’ in-kind support. In 2016, NACME expects to support approximately 1,300 underrepresented minority engineering students.

NACME Scholars (Block Grant) Program

Through the NACME Scholars Program, NACME provides block grants to colleges and universities that, in turn, award the money to talented African American, American Indian, and Latino students enrolled in engineering programs as part of their financial aid packages.

The NACME’s Scholars (Block Grant) Program provides minority college scholarship support in the form of a lump sum grant to partner institutions who enroll students from three sources – first year students identified by NACME or the partner universities, transfer students from two-year colleges, and currently enrolled students who have completed at least one year of engineering study.

University Eligibility

Academic institutions that wish to participate in the scholars grant program must demonstrate a commitment to minority student success that is evidenced in their recruitment, admission, retention, education, and graduation (RAREG) of African American, American Indian, and Latino engineering students.

Student Eligibility

To be eligible for the NACME Scholars Program students must enroll in an engineering program at a partner university, be a URM, and maintain a minimum required GPA (from 2.5 – 2.8). For Fellowships, GPA requirements differ according to the fellowship. Click here for more details about underrepresented minority scholarships (African American, American Indian, and Latino) and other special scholarship programs for minorities.

Academic performance criteria for NACME support differs somewhat for each student stream.

  • High school seniors must be accepted by the university’s college of engineering (at the end of the freshman year, NACME assumes a minimum GPA of 2.5 on a scale of 4.0).
  • Currently enrolled students must have completed a calculus, physics, or chemistry course, earning at least a “B,” and be accepted into engineering.
  • Two-year community college transfers, i.e., those accepted for their third year of engineering study, must enter with at least a 2.7 cumulative GPA on a scale of a 4.0 and an Associate Degree in engineering science (or the equivalent program of study).

For more information about the NACME’s Scholars (Block Grant) Program contact Dr. Chris Smith, Director, Scholarships and University Relations, at 914-539-4316, or email at  scholars@nacme.org.

Payment Distribution

NACME distributes grant payments in two installments each academic year. Under the scholars program, each entering freshman scholar is eligible for $12,500 for up to five years. Two-year transfers and currently enrolled sophomores and beyond are eligible for the identical annual support for up to three years. Scholarship amounts may vary based on the scholar’s financial need to cover the cost of education.

Reporting Requirements

The academic institution provides NACME with a report at the end of the grant period that includes graduation and retention rates as well as biographical information, GPA, and dollar amount of support for each NACME Scholar.

Expectations for Continuance

Partnership agreements are reviewed at the end of five years. Grants are renewed annually to compare institutional performance against established enrollment and graduation goals. NACME expects evidence of continuous improvement toward parity. Such indicators of success would include in the aggregate rising GPAs, reduction in retention rate between NACME Scholars and comparison group (e.g., other minority engineering students or non-minority engineering students), and stable or decreasing time to degree.

NACME In-Kind/Associate Programs

We also encourage universities and colleges not already engaged in our NACME Scholarship Programs to provide in-kind scholarship support to underrepresented minority engineering students attending your school.

Fellowships (Special Scholarships)

The NACME Fellows Program was created to provide an opportunity for individuals and companies interested in establishing a named minority scholarship program in support of NACME’s mission to increase the representation of underrepresented minorities in engineering. This will be accomplished by ensuring that more engineering scholarships for minorities are available.

For more information about how to apply for a fellowship, contact Dr. Chris Smith, Director, Scholarships and University Relations, at 914-539-4316, or email at scholars@nacme.org. For specific information on how to establish a fellowship e-mail, scholarships@nacme.org.

Current NACME Fellowships and Endowments

George Campbell, Jr. Fellowship in Engineering
Dr. George Campbell, Jr. served as NACME’s president and CEO for 11 years. This scholarship honors Dr. Campbell’s service to the mission and vision of increasing the representation of underrepresented minority students in engineering. One student is selected in the sophomore year. The recipient is awarded $5,000 for up to three years. The minimum grade point average required is 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

Sidney and Katherine Friend Scholarship
Joint endowment established between NACME and Polytechnic University. One first-year student is selected and supported for a maximum of five years. The recipient is awarded $2,500 each year. The minimum grade point average required is 2.8 on a 4.0 scale.

William Randolph Hearst Endowment Scholarship
The William Randolph Hearst Foundation supported the creation of this endowed scholarship. Two students are selected in either the first or second year. The recipients are awarded $2,500 each for up to four years. The minimum grade point average required is 2.8 on a 4.0 scale.

Phillip D. Reed Undergraduate Endowment Fellowship
Philip D. Reed endowment fellowship is made possible through an endowment from the Philip D. Reed Foundation. One student is selected in the sophomore year. The award provides $5,000 for up to three years.

The Bechtel Undergraduate Fellowship Award
The Bechtel Undergraduate Fellowship Award is financial support program that encourages and recognizes high academic achievement of students interested in pursuing a corporate career in a construction-related engineering discipline. The award is accompanied by internship and mentoring opportunities. Two students are selected in their junior year. The recipients are awarded $2,500 each for up to two years. The minimum grade point average required is 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

NACME Contact

For more information about the NACME’s Scholars (Block Grant) Program or how to apply for a fellowship, contact Dr. Chris Smith, Director, Scholarships and University Relations, at 914-539-4316, or email at scholars@nacme.org.

Additional Minority Scholarship Resources

Scholarships.com – A listing of scholarships for minorities.

Finaid.com – Information about scholarships and fellowships for minority students. Native American students should also visit the Financial Aid for Native American Students page.

U.S. Department of State – Scholarships, financial aid and student internships.

 

NIH Undergraduate Scholarship Program

UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Undergraduate Scholarship Program (UGSP) offers competitive scholarships to students from disadvantaged backgrounds who are committed to careers in biomedical, behavioral, and social science health-related research. The program offers:

  • Scholarship support
  • Paid research training at the NIH during the summer
  • Paid employment and training at the NIH after graduation

In order to determine if you meet the financial need eligibility guidelines, the UGSP encourages all students to complete the Exceptional Financial Need (EFN) form and submit it to your financial aid office. This form can be filed prior to completion of the online application. Since your eligibility will have to be updated with your 2017 financial aid application data, completion and submission of this form is for informational purposes only. If you choose to submit the form prior to application, please notify the UGSP at ugsp@od.nih.gov, and we will contact you after your university has indicated your eligibility. However, if you do not receive notification of eligibility prior to the application opening date, we encourage you to go ahead and begin the application process.

SCHOLARSHIP SUPPORT

The NIH UGSP will pay up to $20,000 per academic year in tuition, educational expenses, and reasonable living expenses to scholarship recipients. Scholarships are awarded for 1 year, and can be renewed up to 4 years.

RESEARCH TRAINING AT THE NIH

For each full or partial scholarship year, you are committed to two NIH service obligations. The obligations are actually benefits of the UGSP, providing you with invaluable research training and experience at the NIH.

  1. 10-week Summer Laboratory Experience. After each year of scholarship support, you will train for 10 weeks as a paid summer research employee in an NIH research laboratory. This employment occurs after the receipt of the scholarship award. Each scholar will work directly with an NIH Principle Investigator or an NIH postdoctoral fellow, who will serve as mentors.
  2. Employment at the NIH after Graduation. After graduation, you will continue your training as a full-time employee in an NIH research laboratory. You must serve 1 year of full-time employment for each year of scholarship.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

You must meet all of these requirements in order to be eligible for admission into the UGSP.  Please take a moment to use our Eligibility Wizard.

  • U.S.A. citizen or U.S.A. permanent resident
  • Enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a full-time student at an accredited 4-year undergraduate institution located in the United States of America
  • Undergraduate University Grade Point Average of 3.3 or higher on a 4.0-point scale or within the top 5 percent of your class
  • Having ‘Exceptional Financial Need’ as certified by your undergraduate institution financial aid office – see table below (updated 8 November 2017).
Persons in Family
(Includes Only Dependents Listed on Federal Income Tax Forms)
Family Income Level
(Adjusted Gross Income for Tax Year 2016)
Federal Register: Volume 81, Number 15, 25 January 2016, Page 4036
Family Income Level
(Adjusted Gross Income for Tax Year 2017)
Federal Register: Volume 82, Number 19, 31 January 2017, Page 8831
1$23,780.00$24,120.00
2$32,040.00$32,480.00
3$40,320.00$40,840.00
4$48,600.00$49,200.00
5$56,880.00$57,560.00
6$65,160.00$65,920.00
7$73,460.00$74,280.00
8$81,780.00$82,640.00
More than 8 Persons$8,320.00 for Each Additional Person$8,360.00 for Each Additional Person

You are not eligible for the UGSP if any one of the following items pertains to you:

  • You are a high school senior
  • You have been awarded an undergraduate degree
  • You are enrolled in an advanced degree program, such as a master’s degree
  • You are unable to fulfill the payback requirements

APPLICATION INFORMATION

The Application for the 2018-2019 academic year is now open.  To learn more about the application process and requirements, review the videos “How to Apply to the NIH Undergraduate Scholarship Program” and “How to Find an NIH Mentor“.  Your university must also determine whether you meet the required exceptional financial need (EFN) criteria.  To do so, download the EFN form, complete the top section and submit it to the financial aid office at the university you will attend during the 2018-2019 academic year.  Your university will determine your eligibility and forward the form to us.  We strongly advise you to complete the application while waiting for your university to determine your eligibility.

KEY DATES FOR ADMISSION CONSIDERATION IN FALL 2017-2018 ACADEMIC YEAR

(Dates updated 1 November 2017)

  • January 2, 2018 – Application Opens
  • March 15, 2018 – Application Deadline
  • March 30, 2018 – Letter of Recommendation Deadline
  • May 11, 2018 – EFN Form with 2016 Tax Year Information Deadline
  • Mid-June 2018 – Invitations to Phone Interview Distributed
  • Mid-July 2018 – Phone Interviews for Admission
  • Late-July 2018 – Selection of Scholars

This program is administered without discrimination on the basis of age, race, culture, gender, sexual orientation, disability, socioeconomic status, or other nonmerit factors.

NIH is an equal opportunity employer and encourages applications from underrepresented minorities, women, and individuals with disabilities.  NIH is dedicated to building a diverse community in its training and employment programs.

 

100 Scholarships for Minority Students

100 Scholarships for Minority Students

Compiled by Diversity & Inclusion

  1. Ron Brown Scholar Program
  2. FastWEB Scholarship Search
  3. The Harry S. Truman Scholarship Site
  4. The Hispanic College Fund
  5. Jackie Robinson Foundation Scholarships
  6. Marine Corps Scholarships
  7. McDonald’s Education Scholarships
  8. Frito Lay Arts Scholarship
  9. Gates Millennium Scholars Program
  10. Hallmark/UNCF Scholars Program
  11. Intel/UNCF Scholarship Program
  12. United Water Corporate Scholars Program
  13. Liberty Mutual Responsible Scholars Program
  14. Academy for Educational Development Fellowships
  15. American Institute of CPAs Scholarship for Minority Accounting Students
  16. American Society for Microbiology Undergraduate Fellowships
  17. Bristol-Myers Squibb Minority Fellowships in Academic Medicine
  18. The Roothbert Fund
  19. Coca Cola Scholarships
  20. State Farm Insurance Achievement Scholarships
  21. State Farm Insurance Hispanic Scholarships
  22. McNair Scholars Program
  23. National Institutes of Health Undergraduate Scholarship Program
  24. Catching The Dream – Native Student Scholarship
  25. Military Tuition Support
  26. NACME Scholarship Program
  27. NCAA Ethnic Minority and Women’s Enhancement Scholarship
  28. Leonard M. Perryman Communications Scholarship
  29. Methodist Scholarships
  30. Project Excellence Scholarships
  31. Intel Science Talent Search
  32. Alpha Kappa Alpha Scholarships
  33. Discover Student Loans Scholarship Award
  34. Jennings Randolph Peace Scholarship Dissertation Program
  35. APA Scholarships and Fellowships
  36. Udall Foundation Scholarship for Native Students
  37. American Sociological Association Minority Fellowship Program
  38. Americorps Funding Opportunities
  39. Student Inventors Scholarships
  40. Ayn Rand Essay Scholarships
  41. Brand Essay Competition
  42. Xerox Technical Minority Scholarship Program
  43. National Assoc. of Black Journalists Scholarships (NABJ)
  44. Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund
  45. FinAid: The Smart Students Guide to Financial Aid (scholarships)
  46. Microsoft Scholarship Program
  47. Sallie Mae Scholarship Search
  48. William Randolph Hearst Endowed Scholarship for Minority Students
  49. Dell Scholars Program
  50. Jacki Tuckfield Memorial Graduate Business Scholarship
  51. Burger King McLamore Scholars Program
  52. Siemens Westinghouse Competition
  53. GE and LuLac Scholarship Funds
  54. RMHC/HACER Scholarship Program
  55. HBCU “Packard” Sit Abroad Scholarships (for study around the world)
  56. INROADS internships
  57. Courage to Grow Scholarship (Awarded Monthly)
  58. DoSomething.org Scholarships
  59. Epsilon Sigma Alpha Foundation Scholarships
  60. NAACP Legal Defense Fund Scholarship
  61. Horatio Alger Scholarship
  62. HSF General College Scholarship
  63. Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Scholarship
  64. Nissan North America, Inc. Scholarship
  65. ProofReading.com Scholarship Program
  66. P.L.A.Y. Scholarship
  67. Kim and Harold Louie Scholars
  68. SME Education Foundation Manufacturing and Engineering Scholarships
  69. CANFIT Program Scholarships
  70. RTDNA Carole Simpson Broadcast Journalist Scholarship
  71. Surety and Fidelity Industry Intern and Scholarship Program
  72. Smithsonian Minority Internship Program
  73. James E. Webb Internship Program
  74. WHOI Minority Fellowship Program
  75. ALA Spectrum Scholarship
  76. APS Scholarship for Minority Undergraduate Physics Majors
  77. AMS/Industry Minority Scholarships
  78. American Chemical Society Scholars Program
  79. Microbiology Undergraduate Research Fellowship
  80. LAGRANT Foundation Undergraduate Scholarship
  81. LPGA Phyllis G. Meekins Scholarship
  82. National Press Club Scholarship for Journalism Diversity
  83. Chips Quinn Scholars Program
  84. IIE UPS Scholarships for Minority Students
  85. Allison E. Fisher Scholarship
  86. SHPE Foundation General Scholarships
  87. CHCI Scholarship
  88. NACA South Student Leadership Scholarship
  89. Dr. Juan Andrade Scholarship for Young Hispanic Leaders
  90. American Indian College Fund
  91. Ford Blue Oval Scholars
  92. KATU Thomas R. Dargan Scholarship
  93. Morgan Stanley Scholarships
  94. DAR American Indian Scholarship
  95. AAIA Scholarships
  96. American Indian Graduate Center Scholarships
  97. AXA Achievement Community Scholarship
  98. Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation Scholarships
  99. Scholarship America Dream Award
  100. BUICK Achievers Scholarship Program

These websites are subject to change without our knowledge so please report broken links to diversity@unc.edu

 

The Simpson Promise

If you thought attending Simpson was out of reach, we’ve got great news for you!

The Simpson Promise offers you the chance to obtain the excellent educational benefits and life-changing campus experience of Simpson College at a price you can afford.

The Simpson Promise covers the full cost of tuition (inclusive of Simpson, federal and state gift assistance) for qualified students from Iowa families with a 2016 family adjusted gross income at or below $60,000.

A lot of people talk about making college affordable. Simpson is doing something about it with this bold new initiative.

Don’t qualify for The Simpson Promise? We have something else for you! click here

To be eligible for The Simpson Promise, you must:

  • Be an Iowa resident – 2018 graduate of an Iowa high school
  • Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) no later than July 1, 2018, and be eligible for federal aid
  • Reside on campus
  • Have a 2016 family adjusted gross income at or below $60,000
  • Be a full-time, accepted, incoming first-year student

Simpson is committed to providing the grant/scholarship amount awarded to the student in their first year, for all four years at Simpson, provided they are in good academic standing and complete the FAFSA. Students are responsible for the costs of room, board, and fees.

The Simpson Promise
represents our dedication to the success of our students. It is, in fact, the heart of our mission, and it has been that way since we were founded 157 years ago.

 

AMET Scholarships for Migrant Students

2017 AMET Scholarship Program

High School and Prior Winners

Program Description

The AMET Scholarship program is designed to assist college migrant students who are prior AMET winners and have a history of migration and have the potential and desire to obtain a college degree. Awards will be available in June for Summer enrollees and August for Fall enrollees, when student provides proof of enrollment (registration form) to the college or trade school.

Awards

Scholarship amounts are determined by the AMET Scholarship Committee on the basis of background in migrant farm work, financial need, and the academic potential of the youth.

Three (3) scholarships of $1,000 each will be awarded annually to college undergraduate students and twelve scholarships of $1,000 each will be awarded annually to entering freshmen. Scholarship funds are to be used to support the cost of higher education by covering unmet student financial and self-help aid.  Scholarships dispersed are not payment for students’ services. Scholarship recipients may reapply annually to be considered for an undergraduate award.

Eligibility Requirements

  • Be a prior AMET Winner. (Prior Winner Applicants)
  • Be currently enrolled in an accredited educational institution. (public or private college,technical or vocational school) (Prior Winner Applicants)
  • Be a graduating high school senior or junior. (early graduate) (High School Applicants)
  • Must have a current Certificate of Eligibility (COE) for the Migrant Education Program during the student’s final year of high school. (High School Applicants)
  • Must enroll in an accredited educational institution (public or private college, technical or vocational school) in the summer or fall semester following high school graduation. (High School Applicants)
  • Must have a GPA of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale (All)

Required Documents – (Submit in this Order if Mailing in Paper Hard Copies!!!)

To be considered for an AMET scholarship, applicants must submit a complete application including all the required documents listed below annually postmarked by March 3rd.

  1. Completed application (If submitting in paper form it must be typed or handwritten neatly; no blanks)
  2. Scholarship Essay (Typed, one page only – see instructions here)
  3. ONE recommendation letter.
  4. Official or unofficial college. (prior winners) or high school transcript (high school applicants)
  5. Copy of most recent Migrant Education Program Certificate of Eligibility. (high school applicants)
  6. College acceptance letter if available. (high school applicants)

IMPORTANT: Please submit application and the supporting documents in this order ONLY. Applications with missing documents and/or documents NOT in the EXACT order will not be considered and will be disqualified.

Submit application and supporting documents online or mail to your AMET Regional Director.  Students are encouraged to apply online and submit supporting documents (essay, letter of recommendation, transcript, COE).

Application questions:  Wendy Branstine wireneb@hotmail.com or (806)290-3669.

 

Stories of Resilience

The great equalizer in college admissions is student performance. Students who are willing to make the sacrifice and commitment to pursuing academic excellence, whether in Oakland, California, Long Island, New York, or India, are gaining admission into top colleges.

Oakland teen, Akintunde Ahmad (pictured here), accepted into multiple Ivy League schools (Yale, Brown, Columbia, and more).

Click here for video…

Washington, DC student, Rashema Melson, whose father was killed when she was 7 months old, goes from homeless shelter to Georgetown University on a full scholarship.

Click here for video…

Long Island, New York student, Kwasi Enin, accepted into all 8 Ivy League schools.

Click here for video…

Dawn Loggins, senior and high school janitor, accepted into Harvard.

Click here for video…

Indian students use Ivy League colleges as their “safety” schools.

Click here for video…

From Mississippi to the Ivy League for low-income students, Justin Porter and Travis Reginald.

Click here for video…

Richmond High School student, Guadalupe Morales, is Ivy League bound (Brown University). Teachers describe her work ethic, commitment, and grit in overcoming the challenges that she faced.

Click here for video…

National Institutes of Health Undergraduate Scholarships

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Undergraduate Scholarship Program (UGSP) offers competitive scholarships to students from disadvantaged backgrounds who are committed to careers in biomedical, behavioral, and social science health-related research. The program offers:

  • Scholarship support
  • Paid research training at the NIH during the summer
  • Paid employment and training at the NIH after graduation

SCHOLARSHIP SUPPORT

The NIH UGSP will pay up to $20,000 per academic year in tuition, educational expenses, and reasonable living expenses to scholarship recipients. Scholarships are awarded for 1 year, and can be renewed up to 4 years.

RESEARCH TRAINING AT THE NIH

For each full or partial scholarship year, you are committed to two NIH service obligations. The obligations are actually benefits of the UGSP, providing you with invaluable research training and experience at the NIH.

  1. 10-week Summer Laboratory Experience. After each year of scholarship support, you will train for 10 weeks as a paid summer research employee in an NIH research laboratory. This employment occurs after the receipt of the scholarship award. Each scholar will be assigned to an NIH researcher and an NIH postdoctoral fellow, who will serve as mentors. You will also attend formal seminars and participate in a variety of programs.
  2. Employment at the NIH after Graduation. After graduation, you will continue your training as a full-time employee in an NIH research laboratory. You must serve 1 year of full-time employment for each year of scholarship.

Harvey Mudd College Fall Fast Program

Future Achievers in Science and Technology (FAST)

September and November

The Future Achievers in Science and Technology (FAST) programs offer high school seniors from populations that are traditionally underrepresented in the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) an opportunity to experience Harvey Mudd College.

Participants of FAST will stay overnight in one of our residence halls, take a campus tour, sit in on classes, complete an interview with the Office of Admission, participate in a hands-on computer science workshop and much more. There will also be discussions on admission policies, financial aid opportunities, campus resources and the benefits of pursuing a technical degree at a liberal arts college.

The FAST Program is free to all participants and includes lodging, meals and travel accommodations (if applicable). Participants will also receive a fee waiver for a Harvey Mudd College freshman application. If you have questions about the program, you can contact Assistant Director of Admission Maureen Ruiz-Sundstrom at mruizsundstrom@hmc.edu.