AEOP Research & Engineering Summer Program

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

Research & Engineering Apprenticeship Program (REAP) is a summer STEM program that places talented high school students, from groups historically under-represented and underserved in STEM, in research apprenticeships at area colleges and universities. REAP apprentices work under the direct supervision of a mentor on a hands-on research project. REAP apprentices are exposed to the real world of research, they gain valuable mentorship, and they learn about education and career opportunities in STEM. REAP apprenticeships are 5-8 weeks in length (minimum of 200 hours) and apprentices receive a stipend.

PROGRAM GOALS

  • To provide high-school students from groups historically under-represented and underserved in STEM, including alumni of the AEOP’s UNITE program, with an authentic science and engineering research experience
  • To introduce students to the Army’s interest in science and engineering research and the associated opportunities offered through the AEOP
  • To provide participants with mentorship from a scientist or engineer for professional and academic development purposes
  • To develop participants’ skills to prepare them for competitive entry into science and engineering undergraduate programs

What is the REAP apprenticeship experience?

REAP apprentices are high-school age students selected for their interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Special consideration is given to under-represented groups.

The REAP Experience is designed to:

  • Motivate students toward a career in science, mathematics, or technology.
  • Expand students’ background and understanding of scientific research.
  • Engage students’ active participation into the philosophy and objectives of scientific research.
  • Expose students to science experiences not readily available in high school.
  • Introduce students to the real world of research in these fields.
  • Partner students with faculty mentors to support current and future professional growth and development.

What do participants gain from a REAP apprenticeship?

REAP apprentices typically spend a summer in a university research program under the tutelage of a professional mentor, performing experiments and carrying out research activities that immerse them in the realities and opportunities of careers in the applied sciences, engineering and mathematics, changing attitudes and firing the imagination of student participants—many who have but a general idea of what a career in these areas entails, and little or no contact with adults doing this work. Through the REAP experience, student participants are exposed to the real world of these careers and are able to see themselves as scientists and researchers.

Shoulder-to-Shoulder with Professionals

In a typical setting, students spend time applying their knowledge, performing experiments, participating in field trips or working in groups. REAP provides a much needed dimension to their education by allowing them opportunities to work shoulder to shoulder with researchers in university laboratories participating in original research, exploring interests and making informed educational and career decisions.

Personal Growth

The REAP experience allows students to find the answers to the questions they themselves pose about a topic. They develop their English language and presentation skills as they articulate the problems they have devised and through their efforts to solve them, they learn to learn on their own. Throughout the summer, students mature both intellectually and emotionally, develop friendships and foster a good sense of collegiate life. Self discovery of personal strengths and weaknesses and the setting of educational and professional goals contribute to personal development. Dr. Rolando Quintana, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering at the University of Texas El Paso writes of his apprentices: “The confidence they have gained is immeasurable, knowing that their future is a college education. They also have access to a college professor for mentoring and guidance through their high school years, and perhaps most importantly, college student mentors.”

Real World Contributions

Many students contribute specifically to the ongoing research of the laboratory project. Dr. Robert Thompson’s research (University of Minnesota) was focused on using silicified plant cells to identify the use of corn in prehistoric pottery. He developed a research technique which allowed identification to a sub specific level, in other varieties of corn. In order to publish this research he needed to have someone duplicate his results. His apprentice Alison Boutin did just that and more. He writes: “Alison proved such a talented, driven, and reliable researcher that I was able to entrust that task to her, which allowed me to present this research at the Second International Congress of Phytolith Research in Aix-en-Provence, France. Remarkably, Alison was then able to take my research one step further, and present the results of her own work at the same conference.”

Deadline to apply is February 28. Click here to learn more…

PROGRAM LOCATIONS

STATEUNIVERSITY
ArkansasUniversity of Arkansas Pine Bluff, Pine Bluff – Biomedical/Nanotechnology
AlabamaAlabama State University, Montgomery – Mathematics & Computer Science
Alabama State University, Montgomery -Biology/Cancer Research
University of Alabama, Huntsville – Nanotechnology
University of Alabama .  Huntsville – Chemistry
University of Alabama, Huntsville – Environmental Engineering
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa – Metallurgical Engineering
CaliforniaCalifornia State University, Sacramento – Engineering & Computer Science
University of California, Berkeley – Environmental Science
San Jose State University, – Engineering
ColoradoColorado State University, Fort Collins – Physics
ConnecticutYale University, New Haven – Biological, Physical & Engineering
DelawareDelaware State University, Dover – Forensics
FloridaFlorida A&M University, Tallahassee – Engineering
University of Central Florida, Orlando – Chemistry
GeorgiaSavannah State University, Georgia – Electronics Engineering/Robotics
Georgia State University, Atlanta – Physics & Astronomy
IowaIowa State University, Ames – Earth Science
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls – Biology/Chemistry/Biochemistry
IllinoisLoyola University, Chicago – Environmental Nanotechnology
University of Illinois Urbana, Champaign – Physical Chemistry
IndianaBall State University, Muncie – Physics & Astronomy
Purdue University, Indianapolis – Mechanical Engineering
MassachusettsUniversity of Massachusetts, Lowell – Physics
MarylandJohn Hopkins University, Baltimore – Engineering
Morgan State, Baltimore – Chemistry
Stevenson University, Stevenson – Biochemistry/Cancer Research
University of Maryland, Baltimore – Biology
MichiganOakland University, Rochester – Mechanical & Electrical Engineering
MinnesotaCollege of Saint Benedict & St. Johns University, St. Joseph – Chemistry
MissouriUniversity of Missouri, St.  Louis – Biology
MississippiJackson State University, Jackson – Biology
Jackson State Univeristy, Jackson – Technology
New HampshireUniversity of New Hampshire, Durham – Nanotechnology
University of New Hampshire, Durham – Biology
North CarolinaFayetteville State University, Fayetteville – Biochemistry
University of North Carolina, Charlotte – Physics
New  JerseyNew Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark – Electrical & Computer Engineering
New Jersey Institute of Technology, Chemistry & Environmental Science
Caldwell University, Caldwell – Chemistry & Natural Sciences
Rutgers University, Camden- Chemistry
Stockton University, Galloway – Chemistry
Union County College, Cranford – Engineering
New MexicoNew Mexico State University, Las Cruces – Molecular Biology
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque – Nanotechnology
NevadaUniversity of Nevada, Las Vegas – Data Science & Engineering
New YorkCity University of New York (CUNY), New York – Material Science
PennsylvaniaUniversity of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia – Engineering & Robotics
Puerto RicoUniversity of Puerto Rico, San Juan – Physics
South DakotaSouth Dakota School of Mines & Technology,  Rapid City – Advance Materials & Engineering
TexasTexas Southern University, Houston – Chemistry
Texas Southern University, Houston – Engineering
Texas Tech University, Lubbock – Electrical & Computer Engineering
University of Houston,  Houston – Biology & Biochemistry
University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington – Applied Mathematics
University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso – Environmental Science
University of Houston-Victoria – Computer Engineering
West Texas A&M University, Canyon – Electrical Engineering
West VirginiaMarshall University, Huntington – Chemistry
Marshall University  School of Pharmacy, Dunbar – Medicine

 

 

FBI Academy

Youth Leadership Program

The FBI National Academy Associates, Inc. (FBINAA) hosts a week long training event for high school students at the FBI Academy every summer called the Youth Leadership Program (YLP). To be qualified for this program you must:

  • Be 14, 15, or 16 years old at the start date of the program.  NO EXCEPTIONS WILL BE MADE TO THE AGE REQUIREMENT.
  • Demonstrate high academic standards and good citizenship.

Individuals interested in attending the Youth Leadership Program (YLP) need to contact their local Chapter or YLP Coordinator for further information.

For general informaton, please contact Laura Masterton at lmasterton@fbinaa.org.

The 2018 YLP Program is scheduled for June 21 – 29, 2018.

Here is timeline to make sure your applications are submitted on time:

January 15, 2018

Applications available from the Chapter’s YLP Coordinator.

March 16, 2018

Deadline for Applications submitted to the Chapter’s YLP Coordinator.

April 20, 2018

All Candidate Nominations Packages from Chapters/Associations are due to the FBINAA Executive Office.  No candidate nominations will be accepted after this date.

May 4, 2018

Final vetting/selection of YLP students will be made by the Executive Office and Chapters/Associations will be notified of their candidates acceptance.

May 11, 2018

Acceptance letters, File of Life and other pertinent information will be sent to candidates.

June 21, 2018

Program commences; Students arrive and are picked up at Reagan National Airport.

June 29, 2018

Program ends; Students Graduate and return home.

Click here for more information…

The Coolidge Scholarship

Primary Criterion: Academic Excellence

Above all, Coolidge scholars must possess a distinguished academic record. Competitive candidates will have pursued and succeeded in the most rigorous course of study available to them. Awardees will demonstrate an uncommon academic depth and intellectual curiosity. In the case of the Coolidge Scholarship, depth matters as much as breadth. Coolidge winners’ interest in scholarly and intellectual pursuits goes beyond the classroom. Mere credential collection is not a defining trait of a Coolidge Scholar. Jonas Salk, the father of the polio vaccine, provides a good example. Salk so excelled in school that he skipped grades. However, he was also intellectually curious, writing: “As a child I was not interested in science. I was merely interested in things human.”


Secondary Criterion: Interest in Public Policy and Appreciation for Coolidge Values

From his boyhood days in Plymouth Notch through his years in the White House Coolidge studied public policy. This scholarship therefore seeks young citizens who exhibit an interest in policy. Candidates also should demonstrate an awareness of and appreciation for the values President Coolidge championed throughout his life. Some such values include: civility, restraint in government, respect for teachers, thrift, and respect for the presidency. The award is not restricted to candidates planning to pursue degrees in fields such as public policy or government. To the contrary, all academic disciplines are valued by this award. Like the president, Coolidge Scholars will engage in the pressing issues of their time. Like Coolidge, Coolidge Scholars are at all times civil, valuing respectful debate over partisan attack. Candidates will be asked to prepare an 800-word application essay on Coolidge values.


Secondary Criterion: Humility and Service

Humility is a hallmark quality of leaders in the Coolidge tradition. In his autobiography, Coolidge wrote: “It is a great advantage to a President, and a major source of safety to the country, for him to know that he is not a great man.” The Coolidge Scholarship seeks young people who display a sense of service and care for the well-being of others.

Other prizes are awarded to young people for accumulating leadership credentials in high school. This prize focuses rather on high school achievement that gives young people the potential to lead later in life. A young person who tends to work alone, but demonstrates potential to conduct breakthrough research, for example, is a strong candidate. Introverts can win this prize.

The Coolidge Scholarship is non-partisan and is awarded on merit regardless of race, gender, or background.

Eligibility Requirements

  • 2017-18 Coolidge Scholarship applicants must intend to enroll full-time at an accredited U.S. college or university as an undergraduate for the first time in fall 2019. That is to say, students in their junior year of high school, or the equivalent if home schooled, are eligible to apply. (Students who are currently high school juniors but take some courses at a local college are indeed eligible to apply for the Coolidge Scholarship.)
  • 2017-18 Coolidge Scholarship applicants must be citizens or legal permanent residents of the United States of America at the time of application.
  • 2017-18 Coolidge Scholarship applicants cannot be the immediate family member of any current employee or trustee of the Coolidge Scholars Program or the Calvin Coolidge Presidential Foundation.

Eligibility FAQ

  • I’m an international student, am I eligible to apply for the Coolidge Scholarship? The Coolidge Scholarship is only open to U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents. U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents currently attending high school abroad are indeed eligible to apply.
  • I currently am a high school junior, but take some courses at a local college, am I still eligible to apply? Yes, indeed! You must simply confirm that you intend to enroll full-time at an accredited U.S. college or university for the first time in fall 2019.
  • I am a current high school junior intending to take a gap year after high school, and therefore plan to begin college in fall 2020. Am I eligible? No, only current high school juniors intending to enroll as full-time undergraduates for the first time in fall 2019 are eligible to apply for the 2017-18 scholarship.
  • I am a current high school senior, am I eligible to apply? No, only current high school juniors intending to enroll as undergraduates full-time for the first time in fall 2019 are eligible to apply for the 2017-18 scholarship. No exceptions to this rule can be made.
  • I am a current high school senior intending to take a gap year before beginning college, am I eligible to apply? No, only current high school juniors are eligible to apply. No exceptions to this rule can be made.

October 2017: Application opens for the 2017-18 Coolidge Scholarship. Note: only current high school juniors (i.e. students who intend to enroll in college full-time for the first time in fall of 2019) are eligible to apply.

Thursday, January 25, 2018, 5:00 PM eastern standard time: Application deadline. (Note: the deadline was previously January 24, 2018 at 5:00 PM EST, but has been extended. The deadline is now Thursday, January 25, 2018 at 5:00 PM EST.) Please note that only applications submitted by the application deadline, with accompanying letters of recommendation, can be considered. Please take special note of the time zone.

Spring 2018: All students will be notified of the final outcome of their application. Applicants who are named finalists will be contacted directly by phone and invited to Finalist Interview Weekend, which takes place in Woodstock, Vermont and historic Plymouth Notch, Vermont. The Coolidge Foundation will cover the travel and lodging costs for finalists and one parent to attend Finalist Weekend.

Summer 2018: Newly selected Coolidge Scholars will spend an orientation week at the Coolidge Foundation in Plymouth Notch, Vermont.

 

A-1 Auto Transport Annual Scholarship

Scholarship Details

How much is the scholarship?

Three awards worth $1,000, $500, and $250 will be awarded under the A-1 Auto Transport Scholarship every year. The scholarship will be sent directly to the school/university/college’s financial aid office.

A-1 Auto Transport Scholarship

Who is eligible?

Any current, full-time, part-time student of an accredited or non-accredited institute, truck driving school or other logistics program, must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 to become eligible. There is no requirement of minimum age.

How do I apply?

To apply for this scholarship, applicants must write an essay/article (of at least 1000 words and may NOT be posted elsewhere on the internet) about a topic related to this site. Some typical topics could be anything related to:

Applications will be taken on a rolling basis. Email your essay/article to: scholarships@a1autotransport.com along with your full name, contact information, and school you will be attending.

Important dates:

Last date to apply for the scholarship program is March 10, 2018.

Who decides the winner?

Essays/articles shall be posted on our website with content attributed to the author and linked from this page, to be voted on by the A-1 Auto Transport Scholarship committee. The A-1 Auto Transport, Inc. scholarship committee will be announcing the winners on our website at the end of March 2018. The winners will also be notified via email.

I submitted my essay, now what?

Once you submit, we recommend you get the word out — let all of your friends and family know about this scholarship and share the link to your essay with them on your social media.

 

Institute on Neuroscience (ION) Summer Research Program

Application

ION seeks applications from highly motivated high school students who have taken at least one college-level science course (e.g., AP Biology, Honors Chemistry, etc.). After participating in an introductory neuroscience course, ION Scholars are matched with mentors by interest to conduct a seven-week mentored laboratory research project. Weekly professional development workshops focus on topics such as scientific communication, the ethical conduct of research and special topics in neuroscience. At the conclusion of the program, students present their laboratory research results at the ION Research Symposium to an audience of peers, family, friends, teachers and community members.

Program Benefits

  • The internship program provides comprehensive preparation for the pursuit of undergraduate science majors.
  • Student Scholars usually finish the program excited about neuroscience, with an interest in exploring neuroscience-related academic and professional careers.
  • Student Scholars are hired and paid taxable hourly wages (through their matched institution) for their full-time commitment of 40 hr/wk during the eight-week program.

Eligibility Criteria

  • Preference for high school students currently enrolled in their junior or senior year (must be 16 years old by June 4th).
  • Grade point average of at least a 3.0 or the equivalent (B average).
  • Advanced Placement (or other college level) science courses recommended.
  • Able to commit full-time (40 hr/wk) to the entire 8-week program (cannot hold other employment or attend other camps during ION).
  • Scholars must arrange in advance local Atlanta housing and transportation, and are responsible for their meals throughout the summer program.

Application Process

All application materials must be received no later than midnight, Sunday, February 4, 2018 (including letters of recommendation and transcripts):

  • Online Application Form – 2018 Application
  • Personal Statement to be uploaded in the Online Application Form
  • Current Resume to be uploaded in the Online Application Form
  • Recommendation by a high school science teacher (emailed to ION@gsu.edu by the recommender)
  • Recommendation by an adult not related to applicant (emailed to ION@gsu.edu by the recommender)
  • Official High School Transcripts sent by the High School (emailed to ION@gsu.edu)
  • Application Fee of $25 – Please use Georgia State University’s Marketplace for your secure online payment at GSU Marketplace

Applications will be reviewed, a subset of applicants will be invited to interview at Georgia State University in mid-March, and final decisions regarding acceptance will be made and applicants notified in early April.

Immunization records, current TB test results, drug test results, and tax documents will be required for all ACCEPTED Scholars.

If any application materials need to be mailed, please mail to the following address:
ION Summer Research Program
Georgia State University
PO Box 5090
Atlanta, GA 30302-5090

Downloadable PDF Flyer – 2018 ION Summer Research Program

 

STEP-UP (Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons

Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP)

The STEP-UP Program provides hands-on summer research experience for high school and undergraduate students interested in exploring research careers.

Application Deadline

  • 02/01/2018 Undergraduate
  • 02/15/2018 High School

Notification of Award

Mid-March 2018

Register to Apply

Log in to the Student Portal

Program Highlights

  • 8 to 10 weeks of full-time research experience
  • Students receive a summer research stipend
  • Students are assigned to a STEP-UP Coordinating Center to help coordinate and monitor their summer research experience
  • Students are paired with experienced research mentors at institutions throughout the nation
  • Students are encouraged to choose a research institution and/or mentor near their hometown or within commuting distance of their residence. Students are not required to relocate in order to conduct their summer research.
  • Students receive training in the responsible conduct of research
  • All-paid travel expenses to the Annual STEP-UP Research Symposium held on NIH’s main campus in Bethesda, Maryland. Students are given the opportunity to conduct a formal oral and poster presentation.

The STEP-UP Program is a federally funded program managed and supported by the Office of Minority Health Research Coordination (OMHRC) in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The overall goal of STEP-UP is to build and sustain a biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social science research pipeline focused on NIDDK’s core mission areas of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases and nutrition; kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases.

 

University of Tennessee – Sneak Peak (Diversity Weekend)

Sneak Peek

This event is perfect for:

  • High School Juniors
  • Multicultural Students

When

April 20, 2018 to April 21, 2018
All Day

Registration Deadline: Thursday, March 29, 2018

The Office of Undergraduate Admissions cordially invites you to participate in the UT Sneak Peek 2018 Overnight Visit Program on Friday, April 20 and Saturday, April 21, 2018. Our office will provide round-trip transportation to and from the Knoxville campus, overnight lodging, and meals while on campus for a select group of qualified multicultural high school juniors from across the state of Tennessee and the region.

The Sneak Peek 2018 Overnight Visit Program will be a unique two-day experience that will introduce students to the many features UT has to offer in the areas of academics, financial aid, and student life. You will have the opportunity to meet and speak with a variety of UT faculty, staff, and students, participate in student life activities, and take tours of the campus and residence halls.

Note: Participants must have a minimum of 3.0 cumulative GPA on their 5 semester transcript to be eligible. Qualified students will be selected based an overall cumulative GPA from the entire time the student has been in high school and not just the current semester or a one term GPA.

Contact Us

Kevin Berg, West TN Office, admit2utk@utk.edu, (901) 448-8289
Julian Wright, Knoxville Office, jwrigh68@utk.edu, (865) 974-0455

 

Need-based Financial Aid

Need-based Financial Aid

Having worked with hundreds of students through our College Planning Cohort Program, and having reviewed hundreds of Financial Aid Award Letters, we have gained first-hand insight into the array of financial aid policies across the college admissions landscape. Students and parents typically believe that the EFC (Expected Family Contribution), as computed by the U.S. Department of Education, after processing a student’s FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid), is the amount that parents (or independent students) are required to pay toward the costs of attending college.

Many institutions will play on the naiveté of students and parents by providing intentionally misleading Financial Aid Award Letters, which suggest that students with ‘0’ or low EFCs will not pay anything toward their college costs. The most common practice involved in this deception is to list Federal Student Loans under the caption, ‘Awards,’ or using such language as, “We are pleased to offer.” while also failing to disclose the estimated Cost of Attendance.

As a result, students and parents assume thousands of dollars in student loan debt as a means of reaching their ‘0’ EFC. Any remaining financial aid gap is oftentimes closed with a combination of small scholarships such as, Achiever’s Scholarship, Trustee Scholarship, Dean’s Scholarship, etc., which are not renewable after the student’s first year. To register for second-year classes, students simply take out more student loan debt and the process continues year after year until students reach their federal student loan maximums, at which time, many students simply stop attending college.

So what does ‘Need-based’ financial aid really mean?

Need-based financial aid simply means that a college will assist in meeting a student’s full financial need, based on either the EFC, as generated by the FAFSA, or the financial need as determined by the CSS/Financial Aid Profile. However, the means through which a student’s financial need is met will vary widely from being met with generous need-based institutional scholarships and grants, to being met with thousands of dollars in student loans. In this regard, there are institutions that have ‘no-loan’ financial aid policies, where student loans are not considered as part of their financial aid formula, and other institutions where student loans represent the most significant part of their financial aid formula.

How do I identify the institutions that offer the most generous institutional scholarships and grants?

Go to the US News and World Reports college rankings and the colleges with the most generous need-based financial aid policies are atop the rankings and among the most selective institutions to which a student can be offered admission. For example, Williams College is the top ranked liberal arts college in the United States and has the most generous financial aid policies that we have experienced through our students. Students with demonstrated financial need receive free books, assistance with their health insurance, transportation, and other unexpected costs associated with attending Williams College. Amherst College, the number two ranked liberal arts college is nearly as generous. Our students with demonstrated financial need have received institutional scholarship offers from Amherst College covering overing 94 percent of the $72,000 per year estimated Cost of Attendance (after application of the US Pell Grant).

Students and parents must carefully research colleges long prior to submitting applications if students are to position themselves for being offered admission to institutions with the most generous need-based financial aid policies. We have listed institutions, of which we are aware, with some of the most generous need-based and institutional scholarship programs:

Top liberal arts colleges: Williams, Amherst, Bowdoin, Swarthmore, Middlebury, Pomona, Carleton, Claremont McKenna, Davidson, Washington & Lee, Colby, Colgate University, Harvey Mudd, Smith, Vassar, Grinnell, Hamilton, Haverford, Wesleyan University, and Bates.

“Williams has one of the most generous financial aid programs in the country, thanks to generations of gifts from alumni, parents, and friends. It allows us to award more than $50 million a year in financial aid to more than half of all Williams students. Our financial aid program is based entirely on need, and we meet 100 percent of every student’s demonstrated need.  We are committed to working with you and your family to make a Williams education affordable.”

We aim to ensure high-achieving students from all backgrounds realize a Colby education is accessible regardless of their families’ means,” said Vice President and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid Matt Proto. “Colby has many ways of expressing this commitment, most notably that we meet the full demonstrated need of admitted students using grants, not loans, in financial aid packages. This cost estimator is another tool for families to see that a Colby education is possible.”

The Ivy League: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, University of Pennsylvania, and Yale.

“Princeton has a long history of admitting students without regard to their financial circumstances and, for more than a decade, has provided student grants and campus jobs — not student loans — to meet the full demonstrated financial need of all students offered admission.”

Top national universities: University of Chicago, MIT, Stanford, Duke, CalTech, Johns Hopkins, Northwestern, Rice, and Vanderbilt.

“Providing for college is one of the largest single investments a family will make, and we strongly believe that a Vanderbilt education is well worth the investment. Opportunity Vanderbiltreflects our belief that a world-renowned education should be accessible to all qualified students regardless of their economic circumstances.”

“We make three important commitments to U.S. Citizens and eligible non-citizens to ensure that students from many different economic circumstances can enroll at Vanderbilt. Vanderbilt will meet 100% of a family’s demonstrated financial need. Instead of offering need-based loans to undergraduate students, Vanderbilt offers additional grant assistance. This does not involve income bands or “cut-offs” that impact or limit eligibility.”

How many colleges should I apply to?

Because financial aid policies so widely vary by institution, the rule of thumb for students who qualify for need-based financial aid, is to apply to as many selective institutions as possible, to which the student is a strong candidate for admission, so that they student and their parents will have many financial aid award letters upon which to base their financial college choice.

The devastating impact of making the wrong college choice

 

Harvard Debate Council Diversity Project

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF HDCDP?

Study at Harvard– Students accepted into this program are simultaneously accepted into Harvard Debate Council’s summer residential program at Harvard College.  This exclusive educational experience provides unmatched future advantages to our students.  The HDCDP board is raising scholarship funds in an effort to cover each student’s tuition, room & board, and travel.

Enhance college application & professional resume – Academic achievement is not enough for top-tiered colleges & universities; they desire students with leadership acumen.  HDCDP students gain exclusive leadership experiences that will enhance their college application and build their professional resume.

Pre-collegiate training – In Atlanta, students will acquire advanced enrichment through a rigorous academic program in which they will explore content higher than what is available in a traditional high school setting.  From January thru June, students will undergo intensive training by Harvard instructors in preparation to study at Harvard College in July.


WHAT DO WE DO?

HDCDP is an Atlanta-based diversity pipeline program designed to raise the young social & political voice in urban Atlanta and matriculate African-American students into the Harvard Debate Council’s summer residential program at Harvard College in Cambridge, MA.  We accomplish this goal through accelerated education and interactive field experience.  HDCDP seeks to develop the young social and political voice through our 3 pillars:

1.) Scholarship: An incubator for academic excellence– Our goal is to train citizens and leaders of the world, which requires global consciousness. Students will explore international issues through a rigorous curriculum centered on critical thinking, research, analysis, and academic debate.  Students are taught by Harvard instructors, during which they identify, cultivate, and use their voice in matters of social and political justice.

2.) Leadership: A launchpad for young leaders – The fact that young people do not have a vote in elections does not mean they shouldn’t have a voice. This program provides exposure to the challenges that confront today’s voting public through unique non-partisan experiences engaging in local politics and community activism in the city of Atlanta.

3.) Culture: A hub for cultural pride – We seek to cultivate cultural ambassadors that reform the meaning of scholarship into one that is appealing and accessible to black youth.  We endeavor to foster a sense of cultural pride through the exploration of African-American history, leadership, and erudition.  Our charge is to develop students that will embody the principle, “Lift as you climb” – ascending the ranks of social status while reaching back to pull others up, too.

Harvard Debate Council

 

Wells Fargo Veterans Scholarship Program

Wells Fargo is strongly invested in supporting our nation’s veterans, including a commitment to assist them in completing postsecondary education programs to help them return to, and succeed in, a competitive job market. The Wells Fargo Veterans Scholarship Program provides scholarships to fill unmet financial need of veterans after military benefits and other grants and scholarships have been packaged by their school. This financial support will allow veterans to focus on completing their education and reduce reliance on student loans.

The program is administered by Scholarship America®, the nation’s largest designer and manager of scholarship and tuition reimbursement programs for corporations, foundations, associations and individuals. Awards are granted without regard to race, color, creed, religion, sexual orientation, age, gender, disability or national origin.

Eligibility

Applicants to the Wells Fargo Veterans Scholarship Program must:

  • Be honorably-discharged (no longer drilling) veterans or spouses of disabled veterans who have served in the United States military, including the Reserves and National Guard, and have received a Certificate of Eligibility from the Department of Veterans Affairs or another document of service.
  • Be high school or GED graduates who plan to enroll or students who are already enrolled in full-time undergraduate (first Bachelor’s) or graduate (first Master’s degree) study at an accredited two-year or four-year college, university, or vocational-technical school* for the entire upcoming academic year.
    *College must not be on warning or probationary status with the federal government, or must not be in litigation with the federal government or a state.
  • Be Pell-eligible and have applied for Title IV and completed FAFSA to ensure full discovery of actual unmet need.
  • Use any military education benefits for which they are eligible in the upcoming academic year.
  • Have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale, or its equivalent.

Awards

Award amounts will be determined after military education benefits and federal, state, institutional grants and other scholarships are calculated. Awards may be renewed for up to three additional years or until a bachelor’s or master’s degree is earned, whichever occurs first. Renewal is contingent upon satisfactory academic performance in a full-time course of study. Award amounts will increase by $1,000 each year.

Awards are for educational expenses including tuition, fees, books, supplies, room and board, and transportation.

Awards may be deferred for an interruption in study due to medical, health and other extenuating circumstances. Requests for deferral will be handled on a case by case basis.

Application Process

  • Start by clicking Register to Apply at the bottom of this page. You will need to read and agree to a consent statement, supply a unique and valid email address, and create a username and password.
  • Correspondence throughout the application process will be by email. Email messages will be sent to the username and email address registered when you created your account. Students failing to use a valid active email account that will accommodate bulk mail may not receive consideration. Be sure to add wellsfargoveterans@scholarshipamerica.org to your contacts or address book and check your email regularly!
  • Complete the application by entering data in the format described. Proper punctuation and standard capitalization (Jill Smith, 10 Main Street, New York, NY) must be used.
  • During the application process, you may leave the site prior to submission by clicking on the Save and Log out link located on each application page. To return to the application, you must login using your username and password. Saving the application will not submit application.
  • Applications are evaluated on the information supplied; therefore answer all questions as completely as possible.
  • Applications and all required documents must be submitted electronically by the deadline in order for your application to be processed.
  • Once all application requirements are satisfied, the Lock and Submit button will be available to you near the bottom of the Review Application page.
  • Carefully review your application before clicking the Lock and Submit button. Once submitted, you will no longer have access to your application.
  • It is recommended that you print a hard copy of your application for your records.
  • You will receive an email acknowledgment of your submitted application.

Required Documents

As part of your application, you must upload the following supporting documents prior to application submission:

  1. A current, complete transcript of grades. Grade reports are not accepted. Transcripts must display student name, school name, grade and credit hours for each course and term in which each course was taken.
  2. Copy of DD214(preferred) OR Certificate of Eligibility from the Department of Veterans Affairs OR other document of service. Be sure your DD214 includes “Special Additional Information”.
  3. Current college financial aid award letter (preferred) OR Student Aid Report (SAR) from most recent FAFSA filed.
  4. If applicant is the spouse of a disabled veteran, provide VA disability letter and copy of marriage license.

Your application is not complete unless all required documents are submitted electronically.

Program Deadline

Your application must be submitted by February 28, 2018 by 11:59 p.m. CST.

Selection of Recipients

Recipients are selected on the basis of academic performance, demonstrated leadership and participation in school and community activities, work experience, and two essays:

  • statement of military service, and career and educational goals and objectives
  • statement describing any personal and financial challenges that may be barriers to completing postsecondary education

Financial need will be considered.

Scholarship America will select finalists from the group of eligible, complete applications. Finalist applications will be reviewed by a review committee of Wells Fargo Veteran Team Members. Based on the above criteria, Scholarship America will select recipients and determine award amounts. All applicants agree to accept the decision as final.

Notification

Applicants will be notified in mid May. Not all applicants to the program will be selected as recipients. Recipients will be required to submit a college financial aid award letter for the upcoming academic year before award amount is determined.

Payment of Scholarships

Scholarship America processes scholarship payments on behalf of Wells Fargo. Payment is made in one installment in mid July. Checks are mailed to each recipient’s home address and are made payable to the school for the student.

Obligations

Recipients have no obligation to Wells Fargo. They are, however, required to notify Scholarship America of any changes in address, school enrollment, or other relevant information, and to send a complete official transcript when requested.

Revisions

Wells Fargo reserves the right to review the conditions and procedures of this scholarship program and to make changes at any time including termination of the program.

Questions? Contact us:

Email: wellsfargoveterans@scholarshipamerica.org

Call: 1-507-931-1682 and ask for the Wells Fargo Veterans Scholarship Program