Helping Students Pursue Their College & Career Aspirations

AEOP Research & Engineering Summer Program


Research & Engineering Apprenticeship Program (REAP) is a summer STEM program that places talented high school students, from groups historically under-represented and underserved in STEM, in research apprenticeships at area colleges and universities. REAP apprentices work under the direct supervision of a mentor on a hands-on research project. REAP apprentices are exposed to the real world of research, they gain valuable mentorship, and they learn about education and career opportunities in STEM. REAP apprenticeships are 5-8 weeks in length (minimum of 200 hours) and apprentices receive a stipend.


  • To provide high-school students from groups historically under-represented and underserved in STEM, including alumni of the AEOP’s UNITE program, with an authentic science and engineering research experience
  • To introduce students to the Army’s interest in science and engineering research and the associated opportunities offered through the AEOP
  • To provide participants with mentorship from a scientist or engineer for professional and academic development purposes
  • To develop participants’ skills to prepare them for competitive entry into science and engineering undergraduate programs

What is the REAP apprenticeship experience?

REAP apprentices are high-school age students selected for their interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Special consideration is given to under-represented groups.

The REAP Experience is designed to:

  • Motivate students toward a career in science, mathematics, or technology.
  • Expand students’ background and understanding of scientific research.
  • Engage students’ active participation into the philosophy and objectives of scientific research.
  • Expose students to science experiences not readily available in high school.
  • Introduce students to the real world of research in these fields.
  • Partner students with faculty mentors to support current and future professional growth and development.

What do participants gain from a REAP apprenticeship?

REAP apprentices typically spend a summer in a university research program under the tutelage of a professional mentor, performing experiments and carrying out research activities that immerse them in the realities and opportunities of careers in the applied sciences, engineering and mathematics, changing attitudes and firing the imagination of student participants—many who have but a general idea of what a career in these areas entails, and little or no contact with adults doing this work. Through the REAP experience, student participants are exposed to the real world of these careers and are able to see themselves as scientists and researchers.

Shoulder-to-Shoulder with Professionals

In a typical setting, students spend time applying their knowledge, performing experiments, participating in field trips or working in groups. REAP provides a much needed dimension to their education by allowing them opportunities to work shoulder to shoulder with researchers in university laboratories participating in original research, exploring interests and making informed educational and career decisions.

Personal Growth

The REAP experience allows students to find the answers to the questions they themselves pose about a topic. They develop their English language and presentation skills as they articulate the problems they have devised and through their efforts to solve them, they learn to learn on their own. Throughout the summer, students mature both intellectually and emotionally, develop friendships and foster a good sense of collegiate life. Self discovery of personal strengths and weaknesses and the setting of educational and professional goals contribute to personal development. Dr. Rolando Quintana, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering at the University of Texas El Paso writes of his apprentices: “The confidence they have gained is immeasurable, knowing that their future is a college education. They also have access to a college professor for mentoring and guidance through their high school years, and perhaps most importantly, college student mentors.”

Real World Contributions

Many students contribute specifically to the ongoing research of the laboratory project. Dr. Robert Thompson’s research (University of Minnesota) was focused on using silicified plant cells to identify the use of corn in prehistoric pottery. He developed a research technique which allowed identification to a sub specific level, in other varieties of corn. In order to publish this research he needed to have someone duplicate his results. His apprentice Alison Boutin did just that and more. He writes: “Alison proved such a talented, driven, and reliable researcher that I was able to entrust that task to her, which allowed me to present this research at the Second International Congress of Phytolith Research in Aix-en-Provence, France. Remarkably, Alison was then able to take my research one step further, and present the results of her own work at the same conference.”

Deadline to apply is February 28. Click here to learn more…


Arkansas University of Arkansas Pine Bluff, Pine Bluff – Biomedical/Nanotechnology
Alabama Alabama State University, Montgomery – Mathematics & Computer Science
Alabama State University, Montgomery -Biology/Cancer Research
University of Alabama, Huntsville – Nanotechnology
University of Alabama .  Huntsville – Chemistry
University of Alabama, Huntsville – Environmental Engineering
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa – Metallurgical Engineering
California California State University, Sacramento – Engineering & Computer Science
University of California, Berkeley – Environmental Science
San Jose State University, – Engineering
Colorado Colorado State University, Fort Collins – Physics
Connecticut Yale University, New Haven – Biological, Physical & Engineering
Delaware Delaware State University, Dover – Forensics
Florida Florida A&M University, Tallahassee – Engineering
University of Central Florida, Orlando – Chemistry
Georgia Savannah State University, Georgia – Electronics Engineering/Robotics
Georgia State University, Atlanta – Physics & Astronomy
Iowa Iowa State University, Ames – Earth Science
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls – Biology/Chemistry/Biochemistry
Illinois Loyola University, Chicago – Environmental Nanotechnology
University of Illinois Urbana, Champaign – Physical Chemistry
Indiana Ball State University, Muncie – Physics & Astronomy
Purdue University, Indianapolis – Mechanical Engineering
Massachusetts University of Massachusetts, Lowell – Physics
Maryland John Hopkins University, Baltimore – Engineering
Morgan State, Baltimore – Chemistry
Stevenson University, Stevenson – Biochemistry/Cancer Research
University of Maryland, Baltimore – Biology
Michigan Oakland University, Rochester – Mechanical & Electrical Engineering
Minnesota College of Saint Benedict & St. Johns University, St. Joseph – Chemistry
Missouri University of Missouri, St.  Louis – Biology
Mississippi Jackson State University, Jackson – Biology
Jackson State Univeristy, Jackson – Technology
New Hampshire University of New Hampshire, Durham – Nanotechnology
University of New Hampshire, Durham – Biology
North Carolina Fayetteville State University, Fayetteville – Biochemistry
University of North Carolina, Charlotte – Physics
New  Jersey New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark – Electrical & Computer Engineering
New Jersey Institute of Technology, Chemistry & Environmental Science
Caldwell University, Caldwell – Chemistry & Natural Sciences
Rutgers University, Camden- Chemistry
Stockton University, Galloway – Chemistry
Union County College, Cranford – Engineering
New Mexico New Mexico State University, Las Cruces – Molecular Biology
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque – Nanotechnology
Nevada University of Nevada, Las Vegas – Data Science & Engineering
New York City University of New York (CUNY), New York – Material Science
Pennsylvania University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia – Engineering & Robotics
Puerto Rico University of Puerto Rico, San Juan – Physics
South Dakota South Dakota School of Mines & Technology,  Rapid City – Advance Materials & Engineering
Texas Texas Southern University, Houston – Chemistry
Texas Southern University, Houston – Engineering
Texas Tech University, Lubbock – Electrical & Computer Engineering
University of Houston,  Houston – Biology & Biochemistry
University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington – Applied Mathematics
University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso – Environmental Science
University of Houston-Victoria – Computer Engineering
West Texas A&M University, Canyon – Electrical Engineering
West Virginia Marshall University, Huntington – Chemistry
Marshall University  School of Pharmacy, Dunbar – Medicine



About Mychal Wynn

Mychal Wynn, Founder/CEO of the Foundation for Ensuring Access and Equity, is the author of 28 books ( on parenting, student achievement, and college planning, and is the creator of the College Planning Cohort (TM) Program. He, together with wife, Nina, also serve as the Ministry Leaders for the Turner Chapel AME Church Education Ministry.
This entry was posted in High School Students, STEM, Summer and Pre-College Programs. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.